Central government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 04:49:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://devolved.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Central government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ 32 32 Karnataka CM Bommai hails central government’s decision to ban PFI and its subsidiaries https://devolved.net/karnataka-cm-bommai-hails-central-governments-decision-to-ban-pfi-and-its-subsidiaries/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 04:49:41 +0000 https://devolved.net/karnataka-cm-bommai-hails-central-governments-decision-to-ban-pfi-and-its-subsidiaries/ House Cities bangalore Karnataka Bengaluru News Live Updates: Karnataka CM Bommai welcomes Center’s decision to ban PFI and its affiliates Bengaluru News Live Updates September 28, 2022: Police in Karnataka had arrested more than 80 PFI and Social Democratic Party of India (SDPI) members on Tuesday in an early morning operation as a preventive measure […]]]>

Bengaluru News Live Updates September 28, 2022: Police in Karnataka had arrested more than 80 PFI and Social Democratic Party of India (SDPI) members on Tuesday in an early morning operation as a preventive measure

Basavaraj Bommai, Chief Minister of Karnataka. (Case)

Karnataka Bengaluru News Live Updates: Chief Minister of Karnataka Basavaraj Bommai on Wednesday hailed the central government‘s decision to ban the Indian People’s Front (PFI) and its associates. “PFI has been involved in numerous anti-national activities and violence. They have their command outside the country and many of their top officials have crossed the border and gone through their own training,” he said.

“This has long been a demand of the people of this country, of all political parties, including the opposition CPI, CPI(M) and Congress. PFI is the avatar (embodiment) of SIMI (Islamic Banned Students Movement of India) and KFD (Karnataka Dignity Forum). They were involved in anti-national activities and violence,” Bommai said.

A local court in Chitradurga, Karnataka has extended custody of Shivamurthy Sharanaru, the pontiff Murugha mutt for 14 days. He was arrested for the alleged sexual assault of two underage students. Meanwhile, sources close to the pooch said they are due to hold a meeting on September 29 to decide whether Sharanaru should step down as pontiff or continue.

Residents of parts of Bengaluru opting for a shorter journey time to Kempegowda International Airport, located in Devanahalli, will soon be able to take a helicopter ride from the city‘s HAL airport. Helicopter services will be available to and from the international airport and will be operational five days a week, starting October 10.

Live Blog

Bangalore News Live Updates: President Draupadi Murmu inaugurated St Joseph’s University in Bangalore; Comedian Atul Khatri’s show due to take place on Sunday was canceled at the last minute after police refused permission to run the show

Janata Dal (secular) leader HD Kumaraswamy on Tuesday called on the government to reveal the reasons for the raids against the leaders of the Indian Popular Front (PFI).

“If the (state) government does not do this, we will have to believe that these raids are being carried out to divert attention from corruption allegations against the government,” the former chief minister said.

“The government should reveal the details of the findings made and other documents to the people of the state. If they don’t reveal the truth behind the raids, people will suspect the raids are being done to distract from Congress’ PayCM campaign,” he said.

The principal of a public school in Gadag district, Karnataka, was reportedly heckled by activists from right-wing group Sri Rama Sene on Tuesday after asking students to write an essay on the Prophet Muhammad. Activists also accused the headmaster of facilitating the students’ religious conversion.

The incident happened at the Nagavi Village Government High School. The militants stormed into the school and arrested headmaster Abdul Munafar Bijapur, leaving the rest of the school’s population of 172 students “in shock”.

According to Abdul, a week ago a well-known person came to him and offered to fund an essay contest. “In order to improve student handwriting, we held an essay contest based on the book named nalleged which I was promoting Islam, which is incorrect.”

  • The Indian Express website has been rated GREEN for credibility and reliability by Newsguard, a global service that rates news sources on their journalistic standards.

First published on: 28-09-2022 at 10:19:41

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The battle between local government and central government https://devolved.net/the-battle-between-local-government-and-central-government/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 19:58:44 +0000 https://devolved.net/the-battle-between-local-government-and-central-government/ With an endless list of critical issues such as water supply infrastructure and housing to be resolved, consensus between local and central government appears to be a pipe dream, writes Anna Rawhiti-Connell in The Bulletin The relationship between local government and central government is essential In a recent Herald’s article Simon Wilson (paywalled), he lists […]]]>

With an endless list of critical issues such as water supply infrastructure and housing to be resolved, consensus between local and central government appears to be a pipe dream, writes Anna Rawhiti-Connell in The Bulletin

The relationship between local government and central government is essential

In a recent Herald’s article Simon Wilson (paywalled), he lists questions he wants to ask Auckland mayoral candidate Wayne Brown. One is how Brown proposes to work with central government, citing Brown’s failure to get the government on board with a review of the future of Auckland Port in 2018. As we know, the future of the port remains undecided. Wilson’s question is important in the current context of the Auckland mayoral race, but it also shows how important this relationship is to getting things done in New Zealand, whether initiated by local government or central.

Three-quarters of mayoral candidates don’t think Three Waters is the right way forward

At the moment, the relationship does not seem to be in the best shape. Results of a Local Democracy Reporting survey yesterday revealed 75.3% of mayoral candidates don’t think the Three Waters reforms are the best way to make the investments that are sorely needed in hydraulic infrastructures. Auckland and Christchurch councils are pushing back on housing density rules. The detail covered this issue well yesterday. What a time to be alive when someone describes ‘people on the sidelines with popcorn’ in the battle between the government and Christchurch City Council. The Act party leader and deputy leader are traveling to Christchurch to be part of it, with a public meeting on the issue scheduled for Thursday. The government says it’s willing to discuss options. In his newsletter for subscribers yesterday morning, Bernard Hickey indicated that there are signs that the bipartite pact of densification could soften.

Calls for clarification of council power following Productive Land Declaration

In 2019/2020, total consultancy revenue in New Zealand was $13.9 billion. For the government that same year, it was $116 billion. Government has far greater buying power than councils and you can see the lure of centralization and Wellington reform as infrastructure deficits grow and costs rise. On the other hand, the criticisms of decision-making in Wellington and its remoteness from parts of New Zealand are valid. Recent measures taken by the government to protect productive land from housing construction have been met by calls for clarification of exactly what power the board has in Auckland. You must be wondering why this wasn’t clarified with the guidance before the statement was released.

Reshuffling between central and local government hampers progress

Hickey also summarized what he thinks is wishful thinking government on this particular issue. His exasperation is palpable. Constant shuffling between central and local government is hampering progress in a country as small as New Zealand. It’s almost inevitable that local issues will be framed through the prism of the battles over big national issues here, but according to this from the London School of Economics, this is not necessarily good for people’s opinion of local democracy. In my area, all local election billboards are defaced, but those clearly associated with the government seem to suffer from more regular attempts to gouge out candidates’ eyes. That can’t be a good sign for local candidates or central government, or even anyone hoping for an aligned vision of how we might tackle our biggest challenges.

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Kerala High Court Seeks Central Government Response to Physicians’ Request to Practice More Than One System of Medicine https://devolved.net/kerala-high-court-seeks-central-government-response-to-physicians-request-to-practice-more-than-one-system-of-medicine/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 03:05:08 +0000 https://devolved.net/kerala-high-court-seeks-central-government-response-to-physicians-request-to-practice-more-than-one-system-of-medicine/ One of the petitioners is a practicing physician in modern medicine (MBBS) and also in indigenous medicine (BAMS). Another petitioner is a practicing physician in modern medicine and homeopathic medicine (BHMS). The NMC, in exercise of the powers conferred by the NMC Act 2019, has formulated the National Medical Commission Medical Officers (Professional Conduct) Regulations […]]]>

One of the petitioners is a practicing physician in modern medicine (MBBS) and also in indigenous medicine (BAMS). Another petitioner is a practicing physician in modern medicine and homeopathic medicine (BHMS).

The NMC, in exercise of the powers conferred by the NMC Act 2019, has formulated the National Medical Commission Medical Officers (Professional Conduct) Regulations 2022.

The petitioner’s argument argued that clause 4(F) of the proposed settlement clearly violated the fundamental right to practice any profession or to carry on any occupation, trade or business guaranteed by section 19(1)(g) of the Constitution. and it goes against the objectives stated in the preamble of the NMC law.

The petitioners argued that the NMC also breached the authority of the National Medical Commission for the Indian System of Medicine and the National Commission for Homeopathy through Clause 4(f) of the draft regulations.

When the NMC issued a public notice inviting comment on the draft regulations, the petitioners submitted their objections via email to the Medical Ethics and Registration Council through their unregistered association called Indian Association of Integrative Medicine and Research (IAIMR), composed of qualified doctors. and licensed to practice multiple systems of medicine.

However, they did not get a positive response. Therefore, the petitioners approached the court to order the Medical Ethics and Registration Council and the NMC to hold a public hearing to consider objections and comments from the general public, including the petitioners.

The Court sent an opinion to the authorities concerned and released the case for further examination after one week.

The petitioners are represented by attorneys Vipin P Varghese, Adarsh ​​Mathew, Kevin Mathew George, Meera Elsa George and Merline Mathew.

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Central government likely to intervene in Christchurch housing density row, mayor says https://devolved.net/central-government-likely-to-intervene-in-christchurch-housing-density-row-mayor-says/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/central-government-likely-to-intervene-in-christchurch-housing-density-row-mayor-says/ Council yesterday voted against the implementation of the National Housing Density Standards, which allow apartment buildings of up to 10 storeys in some central suburbs, and three houses of up to three storeys in most residential sections , without a building permit. Councilors, who were expected to submit their own plans for how they would […]]]>

Council yesterday voted against the implementation of the National Housing Density Standards, which allow apartment buildings of up to 10 storeys in some central suburbs, and three houses of up to three storeys in most residential sections , without a building permit.

Councilors, who were expected to submit their own plans for how they would comply with the new law, instead say they want the government to reconsider how best to enforce the law in a heritage city like Christchurch.

But the government could also antagonize, putting it at odds with local leaders in the country’s second-largest city, currently led by a respected former Labor minister.

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel told Morning Report that supporters of the decision to reject housing density standards had been warned of the possibility of government intervention, Dalziel said.

“That’s the reality of local government.

“Local government cannot choose what central government asks it to do.

“The law was changed last year. In fact Labor and National held hands, they talked to each other before local government was asked about introducing medium density housing standards in all Tier 1 cities enshrined in the Resource Management Act and we are required by law to do so,” Dalziel said.

The central government now has the option of requiring someone else, such as a commissioner, to enforce the new density standards, she said.

That was probably the decision the government would make, she said.

“I think that’s the step they’re likely to take, I’m certainly writing to the minister and asking them not to take this step but to work together with this city to try to resolve some of the outstanding issues.”

One of the issues in question was the lack of an obligation for developers to retain existing trees, plant new trees or contribute financially to council efforts to maintain the city’s tree canopies, Dalziel said.

The mayor reiterated that she voted to implement housing density standards.

“As mayor of the town, I have to move forward with the decision that council made… the record shows that I voted for notification and I did so because we are legally required to do so, the local government is a creature of law that we can only do what the law authorizes us to do and we are bound to do what we are ordered by law to do.”

Although housing intensification played an important role in avoiding urban sprawl which she said was “detrimental” to the city’s environment.

His support came with a few preconditions.

“Row after row after row of houses that are all the same… without the kind of landscaping and the canopy of trees that gave us the name of our garden city, I think it’s very detrimental to the kinds of environments we want to live in,” she says.

Linwood Ward Councilor Yani Johanson said Christchurch already had the land and rules it needed to allow significant development.

He said national standards have done nothing for affordability.

RNZ

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Thanet council’s proposal to tell central government it’s ‘failing people in need of accommodation’ – The Isle Of Thanet News https://devolved.net/thanet-councils-proposal-to-tell-central-government-its-failing-people-in-need-of-accommodation-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 21:44:04 +0000 https://devolved.net/thanet-councils-proposal-to-tell-central-government-its-failing-people-in-need-of-accommodation-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ Council building houses in King Street, Ramsgate Thanet Council will lobby central government to change legislation and funding to tackle the housing crisis on the island and across the country. Cabinet members propose launching a campaign telling the government that the country is failing people in need of housing. A report on the current situation […]]]>
Council building houses in King Street, Ramsgate

Thanet Council will lobby central government to change legislation and funding to tackle the housing crisis on the island and across the country.

Cabinet members propose launching a campaign telling the government that the country is failing people in need of housing.

A report on the current situation will be discussed by Cabinet members at their meeting on Thursday 22 September.

Thanet Council receives around 1,000 homelessness applications each year. The council owns 3,034 properties but demand exceeds supply.

Thanet is identified as needing 548 affordable homes per year and a key element is the delivery of new affordable rental units. But over the 10 years from 2011 to 2021, the district has only seen an average of 61 affordable housing units delivered each year. This figure rose to 126 in 2021/22 and is expected to rise further to 314 in 2022/23. However, it is far from the 548 required each year,

The council says it has already committed significant funds to building new affordable rental homes and wants to do more. The authority says the aim is to ensure that a much greater proportion of new homes built in Thanet are affordable for people living and working locally.

But Cabinet Member for Housing, Cllr Jill Bayford, says people are facing ‘exorbitant’ rent increases in the private sector, combined with the cost of living crisis, which means an increase in those who cannot afford to pay rent and face homelessness.

She said: “We are doing everything we can to support our most vulnerable residents whose ongoing challenges are compounded by the dire need for housing in our neighborhood. But we just don’t have the resources to be able to provide what is needed.

“With the support of my Cabinet colleagues, we will lobby the government to push for desperately needed changes in legislation and funding, to give us the powers and resources we need to tackle this problem.

“I have personally raised these issues before, directly with the former Secretary of State for Housing, and it is clear from the response to this that a more coordinated campaign for change is needed.

“The national housing shortage, coupled with a trend of more people working from home as a result of the COVID pandemic, has had a massive impact on local housing prices and has also resulted in exorbitant increases in local private sector rents. .

“Further compounded by the cost of living crisis, we are seeing more and more people unable to afford to maintain their current living situation and as a result increasing numbers of people are facing homelessness and seeking a respite in temporary accommodation.

“And it’s not just a question of money, as the report to be presented to Cabinet indicates, the council has access to a budget to build new social housing, but struggles to access suitable land for construction at the necessary pace.

“We are seeking greater government funding for new affordable rental homes and changes to the national planning regime to ensure that more homes are built to meet the needs of local people. The current situation is simply untenable.

“We look forward to working on this issue with our colleagues from across the political spectrum, enabling a more coordinated campaign for desperately needed change.”

The Cabinet report examines housing needs and housing supply and also makes specific requests to the government to speed up the delivery of affordable rental housing.

If the report is formally adopted in Cabinet, it will form the basis of a campaign to pressure the new Secretary of State for Levels, Housing and Communities, MP Simon Clarke, to change legislation, the regulations and financing arrangements so that more affordable rental units can be delivered quickly.

Housing need

Thanet City Council currently has 1,740 households on the housing register waiting for affordable rental accommodation. Among them, 923 are individuals and 817 are families.

In June, Thanet Council said there were 181 households in temporary accommodation, with 96 housed outside Thanet.

The issue of soaring rents and rising homelessness was raised by a ‘Councillor’s Call to Action’ at a Thanet council meeting last month.

Cllr Helen Whitehead, who made the call, said the rise in homelessness had already reached the point where ‘there are no more temporary placements left in the whole of Kent, and families are separated and removed from their support systems while they wait indefinitely for a long time – term housing”.

She hoped to force a formal hearing and central government intervention, but her appeal fell through and was not discussed at the meeting, in part because of the writing of the upcoming report.

“We expect the situation to deteriorate further in the coming months”

According to Thanet’s board: “Recent increases in inflation, fuel and food costs and increased demand in the private rental sector as a result of COVID-19 have caused these price differentials to increase. affordability, and we expect the situation to deteriorate further in the coming months.”

The report to Cabinet members outlines how 29% of Thanet’s population have low incomes, defined as less than £15,988 a year. On average, earnings are £462.50 a week, which is in the bottom 20% of the whole of England.

In the private sector, tenants spend more than 50% of their income on the cost of living. Thanet’s median income is £25,000 and to be affordable the National Housing Federation identifies that only 30% of income should be spent on housing costs. For all property sizes, with the exception of 1-bedroom apartments, rent levels are higher than this benchmark.

For households on Housing Benefit or Universal Credit, the gap between the Local Housing Benefit rate and the private sector rent at the 30% percentile for a 2-bedroom house increased to £170.78 per month.

Private rental market

According home.co.uk there are 89 properties currently available for rent in Ramsgate. The site features 16 three-bed houses available with an average rent of £1332 pcm. The highest number of properties available are two-bed, with 44 listed, at an average of £992 pcm.

For Margate, 96 properties are listed as available to rent with an average rental price of £1156pcm. Among those 27 are three-bed houses with an average rent of £1,481 pcm listed. The biggest supply is two-bed homes with 36 listed at an average rent of £923 pcm.

Broadstairs is listed as having 69 properties available to rent, 16 of which are three bed houses with an average rent of £1270.

Nationally, outside of London, the average rental property is now listed at £1,126 per month. This is 12% more than the same period last year and 19% more than before the pandemic.

Housing stock report

A Kent housing stock report released late last year said Thanet had 67,903 homes with 3,049 council properties; 4,690 registered private providers; 225 “other” private sector and 59,939 private sector.

Thanet has the highest number and proportion of empty homes in the county (2,533, 3.7%). This represents 14.1% of the total number of vacancies in Kent. It also has the highest number of long-term empty dwellings (1,129). This was 153 more than the previous year (a 15.7% increase), the largest increase seen in Kent.

The neighborhood also has the highest proportion of vacant homes that are empty long term with 44.6% being empty for six months or more.

Some 2.5% (1,670) of Thanet’s total housing stock is second homes, again the highest rate in the county.

Data from Visit Kent shows a growing Airbnb sector, with Thanet recording 1,089 active rentals with rental growth of 373% between 2016 and 2019.

Last year, a motion proposing planning restrictions on short-term rentals and a 90-day per year rental limit for entire homes in Thanet on Airbnb was put to Thanet council, but was unsuccessful to gain support for the debate.

Family facing homelessness ‘don’t know where to turn’ due to soaring private rents and ‘lack of help’ for working tenants

Twelve families from Godwin Road flats have been served eviction notices as new regulations prompt ‘more and more’ landlords to sell

A terminally ill man among 10 tenants will receive eviction notices to leave their Broadstairs flats

How to increase the supply of affordable housing in Thanet?

Councilor’s candidacy to debate Thanet’s housing crisis was voted down in a vote described as ‘bad’ and ‘undemocratic’

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Central government will ‘likely’ intervene in Christchurch housing density row, mayor says https://devolved.net/central-government-will-likely-intervene-in-christchurch-housing-density-row-mayor-says/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 21:08:08 +0000 https://devolved.net/central-government-will-likely-intervene-in-christchurch-housing-density-row-mayor-says/ Christchurch City Council has voted against implementing national housing density standards. Photo: RNZ / Nate McKinnon The central government will “likely” step in to implement housing density standards in Christchurch after its council voted to reject the decision, Mayor Lianne Dalziel has said. Christchurch City Council is writing to the Minister for the Environment demanding […]]]>

Christchurch City Council has voted against implementing national housing density standards.
Photo: RNZ / Nate McKinnon

The central government will “likely” step in to implement housing density standards in Christchurch after its council voted to reject the decision, Mayor Lianne Dalziel has said.

Christchurch City Council is writing to the Minister for the Environment demanding to be excluded from government rules for the construction of more houses.

Council yesterday voted against the implementation of the National Housing Density Standards, which allow apartment buildings of up to 10 storeys in some central suburbs, and three houses of up to three storeys in most residential sections , without a building permit.

Councilors, who were expected to submit their own plans for how they would comply with the new law, instead say they want the government to reconsider how best to enforce the law in a heritage city like Christchurch.

But the government could also get in on it, putting it at odds with local leaders in the country’s second-largest city, currently led by a respected former Labor minister.

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel said morning report supporters of the decision to reject housing density standards had been warned of the possibility of government intervention.

“That’s the reality of local government.

“Local government cannot choose what central government asks it to do.

“The law was changed last year. In fact, Labor and National held hands, they talked to each other before local government talked about introducing medium density housing standards in all areas. Tier 1 cities enshrined in the Resource Management Act and we are required by law to do so,” Dalziel said.

Lianne Dalziel

Lianne Dalziel, Mayor of Christchurch. File photo.
Photo: RNZ / Nate McKinnon

The central government now had the option of requiring someone else, such as a commissioner, to enforce the new density standards, she said.

That was probably the decision the government would make, she said.

“I think that’s the step they’re likely to take, I’m certainly writing to the minister and asking them not to take this step but to work together with this city to try to resolve some of the outstanding issues.”

One of the issues in question was the lack of an obligation for developers to retain existing trees, plant new trees or contribute financially to council efforts to maintain the city’s tree canopies, Dalziel said.

The mayor reiterated that she voted to implement housing density standards.

“As mayor of the town, I have to move forward with the decision that council made… the record shows that I voted for notification and I did so because we are legally required to do so, the local government is a creature of law that we can only do what the law authorizes us to do and we are bound to do what we are ordered by law to do.”

Although housing intensification played an important role in avoiding urban sprawl which she said was “detrimental” to the city’s environment.

His support came with a few preconditions.

“Row after row after row of houses that are all the same… without the kind of landscaping and the canopy of trees that gave us the name of our garden city, I think it’s very detrimental to the kinds of environments we want to live in,” she says.

Linwood Ward Councilor Yani Johanson said Christchurch already had the land and rules it needed to allow significant development.

He said national standards have done nothing for affordability.

]]> Central government off the hook for compensation for Alicante-Torrevieja-Cartagena highway https://devolved.net/central-government-off-the-hook-for-compensation-for-alicante-torrevieja-cartagena-highway/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 15:24:22 +0000 https://devolved.net/central-government-off-the-hook-for-compensation-for-alicante-torrevieja-cartagena-highway/ PANDEMIC FALLOUT: Toll motorway concessionaire lost around 3 million euros Photo credit: Lowje THE central government will not have to compensate the concessionaire of the Alicante-Torrevieja-Cartagena motorway for the loss of income during the pandemic. The Supreme Court dismissed Ausur’s appeal for redress amid claims that government restrictions introduced to tackle the Covid crisis had […]]]>

PANDEMIC FALLOUT: Toll motorway concessionaire lost around 3 million euros Photo credit: Lowje

THE central government will not have to compensate the concessionaire of the Alicante-Torrevieja-Cartagena motorway for the loss of income during the pandemic.

The Supreme Court dismissed Ausur’s appeal for redress amid claims that government restrictions introduced to tackle the Covid crisis had directly affected revenue.

Even when the first and strictest state of alarm was lifted, travel was still restricted between the autonomous regions of Spain, hence Ausur’s request for an eight-month extension to the operation of the highway in compensation for losses of 3 million euros.

Ausur argued that since several articles of the second state of alarm decree were later declared unconstitutional, this amounted to discrimination against toll roads.

When the central government ignored Ausur’s initial complaints, the dealer made another appeal in February 2021.

In June 2022, a Cabinet meeting rejected this latest compensation claim, after which the Supreme Court offered Ausur the chance to expand the scope of her claim, an offer she declined, according to provincial media. Spaniards.

Thanks for taking the time to read this article, don’t forget to come back and check the Euro Weekly News website for all your up to date local and international news and remember, you can also follow us on Facebook and instagram.

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Central government and state governments must work together to bring inflation down, says FM https://devolved.net/central-government-and-state-governments-must-work-together-to-bring-inflation-down-says-fm/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 20:06:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/central-government-and-state-governments-must-work-together-to-bring-inflation-down-says-fm/ States and the federal government must work together to combat inflationary pressures, according to Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman. At a conference on controlling inflation sponsored by the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, Sitharaman said: “Now, if state inflation is also to be attributed to the Indian government, we must establish a […]]]>


States and the federal government must work together to combat inflationary pressures, according to Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman. At a conference on controlling inflation sponsored by the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, Sitharaman said: “Now, if state inflation is also to be attributed to the Indian government, we must establish a mechanism in which we work together to address inflationary concerns” (ICRIER).


According to her, there have been several conversations regarding the decentralization of taxable income, and similarly, there are enough reasons to understand how governments also control their inflation.


It seems implausible that the Center is the only entity responsible for inflation management. And when states do not do enough, this region of India suffers from the lack of a solution to the pressure caused by inflation. External variables impact both the federal government and the states, according to Sitharaman.


Despite the Goods and Services Tax (GST), which opened up a single market, eliminated tolls and levies, and allowed freer movement of goods, inflation rates vary from state to state across the country.


She said when fuel prices rose globally, the central government twice cut the cost of items and gasoline wherever possible. “Now, very recently, information generally available in the public domain demonstrates how much inflation has differed from state to state. There could be various causes. However, the reality remains that, strangely, in the States where gasoline costs have not fallen, I see inflation above the national average inflation.


According to her, this demonstrated that the movement of food grains and other food-related products has really affected the price of these products, which constitute the majority of the CPI. According to Sitharaman, India’s approach to managing the economy, which also includes managing inflation, has used both fiscal and monetary policy.


“Monetary policy, which has been utterly ineffective in many countries, cannot be relied upon alone to solve the problem. And these are nations whose economic systems form the basis of the idea that the best way to control the inflation is by interest rates, according to Sitharaman.


She said managing inflation in India involves a variety of strategies, most of which, even in the current environment, fall outside monetary policy.


She said a variety of variables influence how India handles inflation. The central bank, its tools and its management of interest rates are extremely important components, but they cannot be the only ones, according to her.




For comments and suggestions, email us at Editorial@iifl.com

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The central government has decided to name the Rajpath as a path of service, now a meeting of the NDMC will be held on Wednesday regarding the proposal of this name, the officials of the body gave this information on Tuesday. https://devolved.net/the-central-government-has-decided-to-name-the-rajpath-as-a-path-of-service-now-a-meeting-of-the-ndmc-will-be-held-on-wednesday-regarding-the-proposal-of-this-name-the-officials-of-the-body-gave-thi/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 16:56:54 +0000 https://devolved.net/the-central-government-has-decided-to-name-the-rajpath-as-a-path-of-service-now-a-meeting-of-the-ndmc-will-be-held-on-wednesday-regarding-the-proposal-of-this-name-the-officials-of-the-body-gave-thi/ New DelhiThe New Delhi City Council (NDMC) will hold a special meeting on Wednesday to approve the proposal to rename the Rajpath to “Durty Path”. Officials of the organization gave this information on Tuesday. He informed that the proposal has been received from the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs and will be submitted to […]]]>
New DelhiThe New Delhi City Council (NDMC) will hold a special meeting on Wednesday to approve the proposal to rename the Rajpath to “Durty Path”. Officials of the organization gave this information on Tuesday. He informed that the proposal has been received from the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs and will be submitted to Council in a special meeting. NDMC Deputy Chairman Satish Upadhyay said: “The special meeting of the local body to approve the proposal to rename the Rajpath to Duty Path will start at 11am.”

NDMC Vice Chairman Upadhyay said that a notification in this regard will also be issued after the NDMC adopts the resolution. He said that after getting permission, the whole area from Netaji Statue to India Gate to Rashtrapati Bhavan would be known as Duty Path. It should be noted that during British rule, the Rajpath was known as the Kingsway.

The road on which the Prime Minister’s residence is currently located was renamed Race Course Road to Lok Kalyan Marg in 2015. In the same year, Aurangzeb Road was renamed APJ Abdul Kalam Marg. In 2017, Dalhousie Road was renamed Dara Shikoh Marg. Also, Teen Murti Chowk’s name was changed to Teen Murti Haifa Chowk in 2018. Although there have been several proposals to change the name of Akbar Road, nothing has been done so far.

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The central government’s budget plan will be the main focus of the new legislature https://devolved.net/the-central-governments-budget-plan-will-be-the-main-focus-of-the-new-legislature/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 13:34:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/the-central-governments-budget-plan-will-be-the-main-focus-of-the-new-legislature/ Taipei, Sept. 1 (CNA) Opposition party lawmakers said they would prioritize consideration of a NT$2.71 trillion (NT$90.01 billion) draft general government budget plan. dollars) for the 2023 fiscal year, as they began registering for the new legislative session on Thursday morning. Registration of the 113 lawmakers in the Legislative Yuan for the new session began […]]]>

Taipei, Sept. 1 (CNA) Opposition party lawmakers said they would prioritize consideration of a NT$2.71 trillion (NT$90.01 billion) draft general government budget plan. dollars) for the 2023 fiscal year, as they began registering for the new legislative session on Thursday morning.

Registration of the 113 lawmakers in the Legislative Yuan for the new session began on Thursday and will last until Friday evening. But the “opening date” of the new session has yet to be decided by the four party caucuses through negotiations.

Kuomintang (KMT) lawmaker Hung Mong-kai (洪孟楷), the first to complete the registration process, told local media on Thursday that his party’s lawmakers would focus on reviewing the central government‘s budget plan. of 2023, in particular the proposed expenditures for the newly created Ministry of Digital Affairs and the acquisition of vaccines.

The Ministry of Digital Affairs, which has been given a broad mandate to oversee the development of digital infrastructure and cybersecurity in Taiwan, was inaugurated on August 27.

August 27: President Tsai inaugurates the new Ministry of Digital Affairs

The government has budgeted NT$5.7 billion for the new ministry in its 2023 general budget plan alone.

Hung added that he would spare no effort to “hold the government accountable” while “speaking in the interest of the people of Taiwan.”

Similarly, Taiwan People’s Party (TPP) lawmaker Chiu Chen-yuan (邱臣遠) said on Thursday that TPP lawmakers will prioritize proposed national defense spending in the central government‘s budget plan presented by the Cabinet at the end of August. .

The government has proposed record national defense spending for 2023 to buy additional weapons amid a growing military threat from China, Chiu said.

But what remains to be seen is whether those items the government plans to buy can actually meet the country’s needs for self-defense, he added.

The government has set a national defense budget of NT$415.1 billion for next year, which is 14.6 percent of the overall proposed budget plan for 2023.

August 25: Cabinet approves NT$2.71 trillion central government budget for 2023

With additional special budgets and other funds, total planned national defense spending for 2023 will reach NT$586.3 billion, according to the Ministry of National Defense, which is about 2.4 percent of gross domestic product. (GDP) of Taiwan.

Meanwhile, Legislator and New Power Party (NPP) Chairwoman Chen Jiau-hua (陳椒華) said her party hoped the overall budget plan could be discussed as soon as possible.

With this in mind, Chen suggested that the first legislative meeting on the prosecution, which usually takes place on Tuesdays and Fridays, be scheduled for September 6.

In addition to the budget plan, Chen and fellow KMT deputy Yeh Yu-lan (葉毓蘭) also mentioned the proposed amendment to the law regulating the use of police weapons as another issue they would focus on.

The proposed revision, which would give police officers more discretion over the use of firearms in emergency situations, came under the spotlight after two police officers in Tainan died of serious stab wounds after being attacked by a man suspected of stealing a motorbike on August 22. .

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