City government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ Wed, 11 May 2022 16:42:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://devolved.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png City government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ 32 32 The City of Pittsburgh Government Will Support This Year’s June 19 Festivities https://devolved.net/the-city-of-pittsburgh-government-will-support-this-years-june-19-festivities/ Wed, 11 May 2022 16:42:01 +0000 https://devolved.net/the-city-of-pittsburgh-government-will-support-this-years-june-19-festivities/ Pittsburgh Mayor Ed Gainey said Wednesday the city will provide in-kind services to support the June 19 celebrations organized by Stop the Violence Pittsburgh. Stop the Violence Pittsburgh last month unveiled plans to celebrate the holiday June 17-19, with events including a parade, music festival and vendor fair. The city will provide about $60,000 in […]]]>

Pittsburgh Mayor Ed Gainey said Wednesday the city will provide in-kind services to support the June 19 celebrations organized by Stop the Violence Pittsburgh.

Stop the Violence Pittsburgh last month unveiled plans to celebrate the holiday June 17-19, with events including a parade, music festival and vendor fair.

The city will provide about $60,000 in in-kind services to support this year’s celebration, the mayor’s office said. This includes providing the main stage and banners at Point State Park and a secondary mobile performance stage that will be used throughout the celebration. The city will also provide technical support to help with audio on the main and mobile stages.

The Department of Public Works will provide fencing and barricades. Their teams will set up the mobile performance stage.

Public Safety will provide all police services for the parade and traffic control. Pittsburgh Police will provide security at the celebration itself, and the department will provide crossing guards to provide pedestrian safety and EMS to assist with medical emergencies.

“The City of Pittsburgh is proud to celebrate this important national holiday,” Gainey said. “African American history is indeed American history and deserves to be treated as such.”

Pennsylvania officially designated June 19 as a holiday – Juneteenth National Freedom Day – in 2019 and the city declared it an official holiday beginning in 2021. Allegheny County also made it a public holiday beginning in 2021 The party dates back to June 19. , 1865, when Union General Gordon Granger read the Emancipation Proclamation in Galveston, Texas, telling former slaves of their freedom.

Julia Felton is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Julia at 724-226-7724, jfelton@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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Local History: Lakesite Celebrates 50 Years of Municipal Government in 2022 https://devolved.net/local-history-lakesite-celebrates-50-years-of-municipal-government-in-2022/ Sat, 07 May 2022 16:07:26 +0000 https://devolved.net/local-history-lakesite-celebrates-50-years-of-municipal-government-in-2022/ In the late 1960s, after a “marginal area study”, the city of Chattanooga began a wave of annexations of areas north and east of the city, culminating in a trend encouraged by a change in the state’s annexation law mid-year. 1950s. One of the areas identified in the study was Middle Valley, which some members […]]]>

In the late 1960s, after a “marginal area study”, the city of Chattanooga began a wave of annexations of areas north and east of the city, culminating in a trend encouraged by a change in the state’s annexation law mid-year. 1950s. One of the areas identified in the study was Middle Valley, which some members of the Lakesite community north of Hixson considered uncomfortably close. As Collegedale (1968) and Soddy-Daisy (1969) had done, in 1971 the residents hired local attorney Glenn McColpin to handle the myriad of legal details needed to protect the area from annexation by incorporating as a new city.

The proposed new municipality covered roughly 500 acres of the Lakesite Subdivision and had approximately 300 residents. A vote was taken on whether to “create a municipal corporation under the laws of the State of Tennessee” on January 20, 1972. The vote was 75 in favor and 15 against. In March of that year, a list of six candidates contested the election of the first three city commissioners, and Hans G. Bingham, Ray Dodson and Sydney P. Wood were elected. Bingham and Wood were salespeople and Dodson a lawyer. The three commissioners then selected Dodson as the city’s first mayor.

Almost immediately, Lakesite called on Hamilton County to repair some roads, promising to reimburse the expenses from planned public funds. According to Dodson, the county had been behind on road maintenance in the area for more than a year. County Judge Chester Frost thought the proposal was a bad idea but was defeated by a unanimous county council vote. Street paving remained an issue, and in 1978 some residents petitioned the Hamilton County Board of Elections for a vote on dissolving city government and returning to the county. The Lakesite Commission had voted to devote significant funds to road repairs. City voters rejected the initiative by 106 votes to 64.

A September 1981 newspaper article noted the town’s progress, with its population then rising to 951. The commission was still made up of three members, with Marcella Cornish as mayor, Bernard Gloster as vice-mayor, and Dodson as commissioner. Bingham, one of the first commissioners, was then city manager and chief of police. Cornish noted that the town and its residents have a pay-as-you-go attitude, noting that a new police car had recently been purchased in cash. The article also noted that the small municipality had purchased several lots for future planned buildings, planning to replace the green concrete block structure with a garage door that served as the center of city government.

In February 1992, UTC political science professor Dr. David Edwards was hired as city manager. Working only Thursdays, Edwards administered a budget of $112,532 in 1992 and oversaw a full-time police chief, two part-time police officers and two longtime employees, City Clerk Roberta Thomas and City Engineer Curt Blair. McColpin remained city attorney, and local attorney Arnold Stulce Jr. served as city judge. Dodson, having served as a Collegedale town judge himself, noted that Stulce only held court on occasion, observing, “We’re doing pretty well here.”

In 1994, residents of neighborhoods near Lakesite petitioned the city to annex them. So by 1995 Lakesite had doubled in size, ironically using the same annexation procedure Chattanooga had employed years before. The major addition was the commercial district located in the area of ​​the Daisy-Dallas Road and Hixson Pike intersection, extending south some distance toward Thrasher Pike. The city government moved into a new city hall in 2000. The commission now consists of five commissioners instead of three, but the city still prides itself on its fiscal stability and close-knit community flavor. Bingham, Dodson, Wood, Cornish, McColpin, Thomas and Blair have since passed away, and Edwards recently retired after 30 years of service. The small town they helped create continues to thrive and serve its citizens.

Local attorney Sam D. Elliott has been the attorney for the town of Lakesite since the death of Glenn McColpin in 2006. He is a member of Gearhiser, Peters, Elliott & Cannon, PLLC and past president of the Tennessee Bar Associations and Chattanooga. For more information, visit Chattahistoricalassoc.org.

]]> race for peace; A Better City Government Possible – Trentonian https://devolved.net/race-for-peace-a-better-city-government-possible-trentonian/ Mon, 02 May 2022 16:18:32 +0000 https://devolved.net/race-for-peace-a-better-city-government-possible-trentonian/ race for peace The Race for Peace Committee is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Formed in 2016 to enrich the lives of residents in all communities through family-friendly programs, resources, and activities to build understanding between law enforcement and the communities they serve. The main objectives are an ongoing and permanent dialogue with the communities and […]]]>

race for peace

The Race for Peace Committee is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Formed in 2016 to enrich the lives of residents in all communities through family-friendly programs, resources, and activities to build understanding between law enforcement and the communities they serve.

The main objectives are an ongoing and permanent dialogue with the communities and the police; mentor young people; police and the elderly; develop incentive programs that will help promote peace; annual visit to prisons; end violence and bring peace to all communities in our region and country; bring peace and harmonious relations between the police and community members; promote excellence in police training.

The vision of the Race for Peace committee is to educate, circumvent and eradicate racism, violence and discrimination in the world. Race for Peace’s mission is to revitalize the community through enrichment and outreach programs in each community and to maintain a collective voice and the sharing of ideas, creating an atmosphere of peace that encourages good citizenship.

The aim of the Race for Peace committee is to strive to create excitement in the communities, to see through their eyes, to understand their needs and to provide more than they expect. It does this by offering accessible goals and solutions that support peace in the community.

For more information, visit the raceforpeace.org website and the @RFPCSocialMedia Facebook page.

— Alim Howell, Community Activist/Lawyer, Liaison Officer

Better city government possible

LA Parker pokes fun at politicians saying legalizing marijuana is key to Trenton’s future (“Better city government is possible…” 4/26/22).

Well, I’m not a politician, I’m a nurse. I worked at Trenton Psychiatric Hospital and Trenton State Prison. I was an ICU/ICU nurse at Mercer Hospital when he was in Trenton, and I was a public health nurse for the city of Trenton. I have cared for Trentonians in many different ways, and I say legalizing marijuana IS the key to improving conditions in Trenton.

When we legalized marijuana, we ended about 50% of the war on drugs. This war is actually a war on people, especially poor people of color in inner city neighborhoods. Mass incarceration resulting from drug offenses and accompanying civil penalties tripled our prison population in 2006. 86% of the 27,000 state prisoners at the time were black or Hispanic and nearly all were poor inner city residents. The War on Drugs has done enormous damage to our community, damage that will take decades to fully undo, as entire generations have been affected.

With Legal Marijuana, we’ve ended more than 30,000 annual marijuana-related arrests in the state. We stopped the bleeding. Now we can employ downtown residents in this new industry, clear their offenses, help them become business owners, and use tax dollars to rebuild our community. Marijuana use is rightly viewed as a health issue, not a criminal justice issue. Trenton will be much better off because of it.

— Ken Wolski, RN, MPA, Executive DirectorCoalition for Medical Marijuana–New Jersey, Inc.

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Woodstock awards raises to public safety and city government employees | Local News https://devolved.net/woodstock-awards-raises-to-public-safety-and-city-government-employees-local-news/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 14:12:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/woodstock-awards-raises-to-public-safety-and-city-government-employees-local-news/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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Buenos Aires City Government Aims to Allow Use of Crypto for Tax Payment https://devolved.net/buenos-aires-city-government-aims-to-allow-use-of-crypto-for-tax-payment/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 09:44:19 +0000 https://devolved.net/buenos-aires-city-government-aims-to-allow-use-of-crypto-for-tax-payment/ Horacio Rodríguez Larreta, who is the mayor of Buenos Aires, says he wants people in the Argentine capital to be able to pay municipal taxes using crypto-assets. According to a report from CoinDesk, on Monday (April 25), the 56-year-old economist and politician, mayor of the city of Buenos Aires since 2015, announced that the city […]]]>

Horacio Rodríguez Larreta, who is the mayor of Buenos Aires, says he wants people in the Argentine capital to be able to pay municipal taxes using crypto-assets.

According to a report from CoinDesk, on Monday (April 25), the 56-year-old economist and politician, mayor of the city of Buenos Aires since 2015, announced that the city government would allow residents to pay taxes to be made at using crypto, but this crypto will be automatically converted by some crypto payment processors into Argentinian pesos before being delivered to the city government bank account(s).

His remarks were made as part of a speech that presented his “Buenos Aires+” plan, which is a set of 12 measures “to continue building a modern, efficient, close state that takes advantage of technology to support all potential that the citizens of Buenos Aires did.

The head of the government of Buenos Aires spoke of 12 changes to come during his speech. Below are some highlights based on a notice issued April 26 by the city government.

The first transformation: digital identity

The first change is what we call self-sovereign digital identity, which is one of the most innovative tools that are given in the world for citizens to have their digital ID. Through an app, people will be able to digitally authenticate their identity, and this will allow them to have access to all their information in one place, their phone.

The fifth transformation: digital training

The fifth transformation concerns digital training… between April and December, we will extend the digital islands to the headquarters of the central service, so that people who do not have access to a computer can do it on site and that they can learn, so next time they won’t have to go to a public office.




The Ninth Transformation: Paying Taxes

In collaboration with the main companies, we are working so that those who wish can pay their taxes in cryptocurrencies… This does not mean that the City is going to have cryptocurrencies in its public accounts, but that on the basis of a agreement with virtual wallets, we are going to add a payment option to the ones we already have, with the idea of ​​making things easier.

The CoinDesk report also mentioned that Diego Fernández, the city’s secretary of innovation and digital transformation, told CoinDesk that this support for crypto payments would be available in the “coming months.”

Interestingly, on March 28, CoinDesk reported that the city of Rio de Janeiro had announced on March 25 that it plans to authorize “the payment of a municipal property tax with cryptocurrencies from 2023 “.

Apparently Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes said in a statement:

Our effort here is to clarify that in the city of Rio we have official initiatives that recognize this market… From now on, those who invest in cryptocurrency and live in the city of Rio will be able to spend this asset here by paying the official tax in the city of Rio. And we will move just as fast.

Warning

The views and opinions expressed by the author, or anyone mentioned in this article, are for informational purposes only and do not constitute financial, investment or other advice. Investing in or trading crypto-assets involves the risk of financial loss.

Image credit

Featured image by “moerschy” via Pixabay.com

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Fort Worth Becomes First U.S. Municipal Government to Mine Bitcoin – Welcome to the City of Fort Worth https://devolved.net/fort-worth-becomes-first-u-s-municipal-government-to-mine-bitcoin-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 17:08:34 +0000 https://devolved.net/fort-worth-becomes-first-u-s-municipal-government-to-mine-bitcoin-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ Posted on April 26, 2022 Today, Fort Worth becomes the first city government in the United States to mine Bitcoin. This pilot program, launched by the office of Fort Worth Mayor Mattie Parker and the City of Fort Worth in partnership with the Texas Blockchain Council, recognizes the exponential growth of the blockchain […]]]>

Posted on April 26, 2022



Today, Fort Worth becomes the first city government in the United States to mine Bitcoin. This pilot program, launched by the office of Fort Worth Mayor Mattie Parker and the City of Fort Worth in partnership with the Texas Blockchain Council, recognizes the exponential growth of the blockchain and cryptocurrency industries while advancing Fort Worth’s goal of becoming a leading technology and technology center. innovation.

Starting today, the S9 Bitcoin mining machines will operate 24/7 in the temperature-controlled Information Technology Solutions Department data center located at the City Hall of Fort Worth, where they will be hosted on a private network to minimize security risks. The program is made possible by the donation of three machines from the Texas Blockchain Council, a nonprofit made up of companies and individuals who work in the bitcoin, bitcoin mining, crypto and blockchain industries. The donation was officially accepted by the Fort Worth City Council today.

“With blockchain technology and cryptocurrency revolutionizing the financial landscape, we want to transform Fort Worth into a tech-friendly city,” Parker said. “Today, with the support and partnership of the Texas Blockchain Council, we are stepping into this small-scale world while sending a big message – Fort Worth is where the future begins,” the mayor added. “These small but mighty machines mark Fort Worth’s broader commitment to becoming a premier hub for technology and innovation.”

“The Texas Blockchain Council is thrilled to be part of this first-of-its-kind pilot program as the city of Fort Worth begins mining Bitcoin. By starting small and learning as you go, Fort Worth is positioning itself as the bitcoin mining capital of Texas. The state as a whole has already established itself as the bitcoin mining capital of the world,” said Texas Blockchain Council President and Founder Lee Bratcher. “We are grateful for the support of several of our member companies, particularly Luxor Technologies and Rhodium Enterprises, as they provided strategic advice for this project.”

Bitcoin mining is the process by which new bitcoins are brought into circulation. The “mining” is performed using sophisticated hardware that solves an extremely complex mathematical computational problem. The first computer to find the solution to the problem receives the next block of bitcoins and the process begins again.

By limiting the concentration of the pilot program to three machines, the city achieves the goals of responsible evaluation and execution of a municipal Bitcoin mining program on a manageable scale. After six months, the city will evaluate the program.

Depending on the number and type of machines used, the city estimates that each will consume the same amount of energy as a household vacuum cleaner. The nominal amount of energy needed by the program should be offset by the value of bitcoin mined. Keeping the pilot program small allows the city to learn the potential impact and opportunities for bitcoin.

“Texas is increasingly recognized as the world leader in bitcoin and blockchain, and Fort Worth will have a seat at that table,” said Fort Worth Director of Economic Development Robert Sturns. “The pioneering spirit is alive and well in Fort Worth, and with this program, we will attract dynamic companies that share this vision for the future.”

The program is part of Fort Worth’s broader growth plan, building on recent efforts including partnerships with the planned Texas A&M University System research and innovation center in downtown Fort Worth and Techstars Physical Health Fort Worth Accelerator, and establishing the city’s premier entrepreneurship and innovation. Board Committee to build a next-level entrepreneurship ecosystem.

In the City of Fort Worth’s Strategic Economic Development Plan adopted by the City Council, the city set a goal “A top-level economic development strategy should encourage innovation and creativity, create an attractive environment for talented people and dynamic companies and maintaining a forward-looking organization.

Photo: Fort Worth Mayor Mattie Parker stands amid bitcoin mining machines in the City of Fort Worth Information Technology Solutions Department’s data center, marking the city’s commitment to become a hub of technology and innovation.

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14 proposals compete for $300,000 from the Eau Claire city government | cover page https://devolved.net/14-proposals-compete-for-300000-from-the-eau-claire-city-government-cover-page/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/14-proposals-compete-for-300000-from-the-eau-claire-city-government-cover-page/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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🌱 Mall Shooting Suspects Denied Bond + Open City Government Jobs https://devolved.net/%f0%9f%8c%b1-mall-shooting-suspects-denied-bond-open-city-government-jobs/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 20:44:56 +0000 https://devolved.net/%f0%9f%8c%b1-mall-shooting-suspects-denied-bond-open-city-government-jobs/ Hey, Colombia! We’re catching up with you all to start this Saturday, April 23 on an enlightened note. Here’s everything you need to know in town today. First, today’s weather forecast: Partially sunny. High: 82 Low: 56. Here are today’s top stories from Colombia: All three suspects were denied bail in last Saturday’s shooting at […]]]>

Hey, Colombia! We’re catching up with you all to start this Saturday, April 23 on an enlightened note. Here’s everything you need to know in town today.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Partially sunny. High: 82 Low: 56.


Here are today’s top stories from Colombia:

  1. All three suspects were denied bail in last Saturday’s shooting at a South Carolina mall. Nine people were injured by bullets while six others were injured while fleeing the scene. The suspects are now awaiting trial in prison, having been deemed by the judge to be a flight risk. (WSOC Charlotte)
  2. Looking for a job with the City of Columbia government? Here are the best jobs available right now. The highest position peaks at a salary of $112,000. Jobs range from city attorney to traffic engineering. See the full list at the link. (State)
  3. A new seafood restaurant is opening in the Columbia Midlands. Krab Kingz is located on Colonial Life Boulevard and is ready to serve seafood. Mayor Daniel Rickenmann spoke at the grand opening Thursday to celebrate the economic development. Learn more at the link. (Abccolumbia.com)

Today in Colombia:

  • McDaniels Subaru Bark at Park 2022 at Saluda Shoals Park (10:00 a.m.)
  • Scheherazade by the South Carolina Philharmonic Orchestra at the Koger Center For The Arts (7:30 p.m.)
  • The Charles Page Trio presents a night of soulful grooves at the Chayz lounge (8:00 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • Fireflies of Colombia congratulated the winners of the Columbia Metropolitan Airport bullpen. The reliever box giveaway will go to more groups throughout the season – be on the lookout. (Facebook)
  • PETSinc shared a cute little meme to remind you why they save. Click the post link for a reminder of why cats can be useful around the home. (Facebook)
  • Heading to Myrtle Beach? South Carolina Humanities invites you to an upcoming concert. Violins of Hope & Varna International will perform on Sunday. Learn more about the position. (Facebook)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!

Events:


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You are now aware and ready to go out this Saturday! See you tomorrow morning for another update.

Dan Casarella

About me: Dan Casarella is a writer, podcast producer, and small business development specialist who previously worked in late night television. He has produced numerous chat segments, including with President Joe Biden, Kobe Bryant and Chadwick Boseman. Dan studied Media Studies and Production at Temple University. He also enjoys running, painting, and the ups and downs of Philadelphia sports teams.

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Program invites teens to learn about municipal government https://devolved.net/program-invites-teens-to-learn-about-municipal-government/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 05:02:18 +0000 https://devolved.net/program-invites-teens-to-learn-about-municipal-government/ The City of Round Rock is once again partnering with Round Rock ISD to host its popular UniverCity civic education program for high school students. Round Rock Teen UniverCity is a program that gives juniors and seniors the opportunity to experience the inner workings of city government. The course aims for students to use their […]]]>

The City of Round Rock is once again partnering with Round Rock ISD to host its popular UniverCity civic education program for high school students.

Round Rock Teen UniverCity is a program that gives juniors and seniors the opportunity to experience the inner workings of city government. The course aims for students to use their experience to learn how young people can have a voice in local government issues and explore future career opportunities in public service.

The program will run from Monday June 6 to Thursday June 16. Each day, students will learn about different facets of municipal government by participating in presentations that include interactive tours of facilities and hands-on activities. Attendees will visit departments such as the City Council, Fire Department, Information Technology, Finance, and Parks and Recreation.

Exciting experiences throughout the program include a tour and discussion of the future development of downtown Round Rock, an exercise with communications to learn about interview best practices, an escape activity and a ATV tour of parks and sports facilities. Throughout their service visits, participants will meet various city officials and employees, learn strategies to improve the community, network and learn about career development.

The program will meet from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day and will include a catered lunch for each participant. The program is open to juniors and seniors attending the Round Rock ISD school, and the class will consist of at least two to three representatives from each Round Rock ISD high school.

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Community meeting addresses racist flyers in Heights | city ​​government https://devolved.net/community-meeting-addresses-racist-flyers-in-heights-city-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bgovernment/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 18:04:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/community-meeting-addresses-racist-flyers-in-heights-city-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bgovernment/ Following the distribution of racist and anti-Semitic leaflets distributed in the central and northern parts of the Heights Last month, a recent community meeting attempted to address residents’ concerns and detail steps they should take in the event of similar incidents in the future. Between 15 and 20 community members gathered inside the Heights Fire […]]]>

Following the distribution of racist and anti-Semitic leaflets distributed in the central and northern parts of the Heights Last month, a recent community meeting attempted to address residents’ concerns and detail steps they should take in the event of similar incidents in the future.

Between 15 and 20 community members gathered inside the Heights Fire Hall at 107 W. 12and Last Wednesday, April 6, for a meeting hosted by Houston City Council Member Abbie Kamin, in partnership with the Houston Police Department and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) South West Regional Office.

“Residents come together to oppose hate and white supremacy,” Kamin wrote on Facebook after the meeting.

During the meeting, representatives from the HPD and ADL spoke to residents about how to handle the spread of divisive and hateful material in their neighborhood. One of their main goals was to remind residents to contact local law enforcement or the ADL if similar incidents occur in the future, and they discouraged residents from posting images of the flyers on the streets. social networks to minimize the spread of hateful information and also to prevent responsible individuals or groups from attracting attention that they can use to recruit and fundraise.

Houston Heights Association executive director Emily Guyre said she overheard several residents asking if police had identified or arrested anyone in connection with the flyer distribution. In response, an HPD representative stated that since these flyers are categorized as freedom of speech, their distribution cannot be considered a hate crime, as no criminal act was knowingly committed against a person or their goods.

The HPD website defines a hate crime as “any crime committed against a person or property that is motivated, in whole or in part, by an offender’s prejudice against race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, ethnic origin, gender or gender identity. gender. A spokesperson for the Harris County 1 Constable’s Office previously said there was no indication that anyone’s person or property was harmed in association with the distribution of the flyers at the heights.

However, HPD and ADL representatives said that doesn’t mean residents shouldn’t act if they see something they think might be motivated by any of the aforementioned biases.

In addition to reporting non-emergency incidents or perceived threats to HPD by calling 713-884-3131, residents can also file a report online on the Anti-Defamation League website at adl.org/reportincident or by calling the ADL regional office at 713-627-3490.

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