Local government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 16:57:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://devolved.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Local government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ 32 32 “The advice was cheated. We need more government money ‘| Local government https://devolved.net/the-advice-was-cheated-we-need-more-government-money-local-government/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/the-advice-was-cheated-we-need-more-government-money-local-government/ VSraig Cheney sits slumped in his chair, looking dejected instead of his usually cheerful demeanor. Bristol’s deputy mayor, who is also chairman of the city council’s finance committee, is set to save £ 23million in next year’s budget – on top of nearly £ 100million in cuts three ago years – to balance the books. […]]]>

VSraig Cheney sits slumped in his chair, looking dejected instead of his usually cheerful demeanor. Bristol’s deputy mayor, who is also chairman of the city council’s finance committee, is set to save £ 23million in next year’s budget – on top of nearly £ 100million in cuts three ago years – to balance the books.

“We have ways to swallow our own smoke if the only problem is inflation, but there are so many other additional costs that we have to face,” says the former business consultant turned labor adviser. “It’s hard.”

It could have been worse. Until Rishi Sunak’s autumn budget, the gap in Bristol’s finances for next year was £ 41million, or around 10% of the city’s daily spending.

In Liverpool, Deputy Mayor Jane Corbett must find £ 34million in savings before the next March deadline to present a balanced budget.

“We are living on sums of government money,” says the longtime adviser, “and while we are grateful for the support we received during the pandemic, our budgets for social care for adults and children cannot just not cope. growing demand.

Nottingham council is fighting to save £ 28million and avoid closing six children’s centers. Photograph: Tim Goode / PA

Like many other county authorities, Lancashire Council has also launched a search for savings, in its case of £ 43million. Thurrock in Essex, a unitary authority led by the Tories, is seeking to cut one in four jobs and sell assets, including the Thameside Theater in Grays, to save £ 34million by 2024. Nottingham, which billed D-Band’s highest municipal tax this year to make up for a large deficit, is fighting to save £ 28million next year and avoid closing six children’s centers, with the loss of 91 jobs.

They are among hundreds of councils, led by Conservatives or Labor, now wondering how to reconcile the Chancellor’s message that austerity is over with public sector deficits running into billions of pounds.

During the pandemic, the government offered local authorities a financial lifeline. But since the spring and the end of the third lockdown, ministers have focused their generosity on capital spending, as part of a loosely defined agenda to level the regions.

Locked in various pots, including the cities fund and the ‘leveling up’ fund, over £ 8billion that councils can bid on if they are able to show tangible benefits by giving a kick from youth to main streets and housing estates.

On the other hand, liquidity for statutory services, which must be separated from capital funds, is largely depleted, at a time when rising prices and falling social benefits put additional pressure on low-income households.

In the budget, around an additional £ 1.6bn per year was pledged to the councils for the three years from 2022, although part of that additional money comes from a maximum annual increase of 3% of the housing tax. This means the average household bill could reach £ 2,074 by 2024-25, up from £ 1,898 today.

Ahead of the fall budget, Sunak vowed, “What we’re going to see is absolutely no return to austerity. People are going to see very significant investments in public services.

Michael Gove, secretary of state in the Department of Leveling, Housing and Communities (DLUHC), is currently engaged in a battle with Sunak for more funds, but sources close to No.11 do not expect that Gove emerges waving a big check. They say the Chancellor is resisting any increase in the three-year settlement agreed with Whitehall’s departments, pushing an announcement slated for last week around Christmas or possibly the New Year.

“The boards’ point of view was that a big hitter had arrived in the form of Michael Gove, but his silence makes people uncomfortable,” said Jonathan Carr-West, head of the think tank of the Local government information unit.

Jayne Kirkham, a Labor member of the Conservative-controlled Cornwall council, is angry that the county has been ‘wronged by the government’. Cornwall is one of the poorest regions in Europe and before Brexit it benefited from EU social funds. It was owed £ 100million a year over the next seven years from Brussels.

After originally pledging to replace EU money lost for advice, the government instead chose to distribute money through a new shared prosperity fund to “reduce inequalities between communities”. Cornwall has only got £ 1million so far.

Investment funds for road and hospital construction, however, do not pay public sector wages. Before next April, Cornwall council plans to cut 410 posts, or around 10% of all council jobs, as part of a draft plan to close a £ 55million gap in the 2022 annual budget -2023. Advisors will review the plan at a meeting this week.

The Tories came to power in Truro in this year’s May election after all six constituencies from Westminster to Cornwall turned blue following Boris Johnson’s 2019 victory.

Kirkham says a mix of service cuts – including the closing of four swimming pools – a 3% municipal tax increase and a willingness to outsource more operations to the private sector and charities will prove to be detrimental .

“We just need more government money,” she said. “A 1% council tax increase only raises £ 3million in Cornwall, so it’s hard to see how the council can avoid raising it as much as it’s allowed.”

The proposals include cutting social worker jobs, although Cornwall’s new administration admits child and adult care services are facing an increase in the number of cases.

A report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies earlier this year showed that local authorities were the biggest losers from government austerity measures, suffering budget cuts between 2010 and 2020 of 40% once inflation is factored in. .

Strengthening liver liverpool
Liverpool say they are living on temporary handouts from the central government. Photograph: Christopher Thomond / The Guardian

Corbett, who represents a part of Liverpool that ranks among the poorest in the country, said for his city the measures amounted to £ 450million in lost revenue. Now he “lives on handouts from the central government” which lasts a few months before running out.

“When you find out in October that £ 6million is available to support the most vulnerable during the winter – and the money was only signed a fortnight ago, but must all be spent by now March 2022 – you can see how difficult it is to plan and deliver services right now.

Any improvement can only follow planning, and this is difficult when the government still has to decide on several important questions: the proportion of business rates that the municipalities will be able to keep; how the local government funding system will be agreed; and the results of a fair funding review.

The DLUHC said the councils have benefited from more than £ 12 billion in the past 18 months, “with over £ 6 billion available to spend as they see fit”. He added: “We have made it clear that the councils should not put taxpayer dollars at risk unduly and that local people will continue to have the final say on the council tax, with the possibility of veto excessive increases. ”

Bristol is considered one of Britain’s most desirable cities and its population is growing. But several neighborhoods within city limits rank among the poorest in the country, with a high proportion of families in need of municipal services.

Bristol Town Hall and College Green
Bristol is considered a wealthy city but has pockets of poverty that “go unrecognized”. Photograph: eye35.pix / Alamy

“We are clustered in the wealthier south of the country, which means Bristol’s specific problems are not recognized,” Deputy Mayor Cheney said.

It selected nine of the 47 shopping streets and parades of stores for financial support, to avoid a collapse in the number of retailers. But its ability to do more is limited as corporate tax revenues decline and the government is slow to provide details on how the additional funds will be distributed.

“We want to consult each other on the choices we will have to make,” he adds, “but that is not possible, not when so much is undecided.”


Source link

]]>
Regulators brace for more pressure with new variant https://devolved.net/regulators-brace-for-more-pressure-with-new-variant/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 13:10:09 +0000 https://devolved.net/regulators-brace-for-more-pressure-with-new-variant/ Regulatory officers face ‘backlogs, pressure on capacity’ and ‘significant skills gaps in the workforce’, with new waves of Covid and new Brexit demands to the horizon. But given the increased demands of the pandemic, the profile of their role has “never been higher,” they were told. Yvonne Rees, chief executive of Oxfordshire CC and Cherwell […]]]>

Regulatory officers face ‘backlogs, pressure on capacity’ and ‘significant skills gaps in the workforce’, with new waves of Covid and new Brexit demands to the horizon.

But given the increased demands of the pandemic, the profile of their role has “never been higher,” they were told.

Yvonne Rees, chief executive of Oxfordshire CC and Cherwell DC, told regulators at a conference yesterday hosted by the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health and the Chartered Trading Standards Institute that they have a “moment. in time “to” retain [the] popularity “that they have accumulated during the pandemic, and” to continue to demonstrate the value of your professions “.

“The profile of your services has never been higher. But above all, the budgets of local authorities… are declining. We have to cut our fabric accordingly, and I have to prioritize, “Ms Rees said, adding,” Make sure I don’t cut you. Make sure your CEOs and senior managers really recognize what you’ve done and what you need to do.

Ms Rees, along with Graham Farrant, managing director of Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council, highlighted some of the challenges ahead that regulators will face.

Mr Farrant told delegates that “subsequent waves of Covid will require a re-prioritization.”

“With the new variant, let’s go. We must be ready to deploy the same effort over the next few months, “he added.

Ms Rees, who described the health system on her own as currently “in turmoil”, said local government “must be there to support a health system …”.

“This is going to be a challenge for the health system itself. We have to get into space to help them support them. “

Mr Farrant also highlighted the impact of Britain’s exit from the EU on regulators, telling delegates: ‘We don’t see all the Brexit demands yet and that will put pressure on them, so there there is still work to come. “

In the context of Covid, Ms Rees said she is now ‘back in the cycle of more central government compliance task forces as I suspect more regulatory requirements will be expected from us shortly. “.

“We’re going to have to work with and help the retail business adjust to what the new world looks like,” she added.

Highlighting other key policy areas that regulators are working on, Ms Rees said: “You are critical to climate change… what can you do to help local authorities tackle this that will keep you relevant?

“I know my guys are scratching their heads with some of the Food Standards Agency’s recovery programs,” she added. “I just know I have teams that devour this.”

Mr Farrant revealed to the conference the lack of understanding within Whitehall at the start of the pandemic about the role of local regulators. During some of his early conversations with the government about the application of Covid regulations in businesses, “they were unaware that we were enforcing occupational health and safety in a lot of businesses,” he said.

“So for the practical implementation of health and safety, they were talking to the health and safety manager. [HSE]. But in reality the number of locals, the links with companies are much more important from the point of view of the community than of the HSE. The more we can remind them of that, the better.

Mr Farrant told officials there were 13,000 premises where the council enforced the implementation in its area of ​​authority and 3,000 where the Health and Safety Executive was involved. He said he had learned over the past year the “need to continue to give government examples of what we do.”

“Because when they have concrete examples, they understand it. When talking about a policy change or overhaul, they often don’t think of local government in that context. “

Mr Farrant asserted that “the full extent of the arrears” in the regulatory services “was not known by central government departments or by people like the FSA or the Health and Safety Executive.”

“So this intelligence gathering was really important,” he added.

Mr Farrant explained how the government became aware of the role of regulatory services during the pandemic, with a Cabinet Office agenda on the issue emerging where previously the ministry had not been involved.

He asserted that there is now “a real and better understanding and appreciation within government, as well as within local authorities, of the need to prioritize [regulatory] work and how we might approach it ”.

Mr Farrant expressed sympathy for businesses in the current climate, which face “a whole load of additional regulations to come” on top of “normal constraints”, as well as “specific professional regulations” and “a whole range of regulations. grants “that they can apply for.

“It’s a lot more complicated for businesses right now. We need to understand this as regulators. But we also need to be clear about the standards we are going to adopt and how we are going to apply them. “

Ms. Rees also highlighted the regulatory challenges currently facing local recreation services. She said that in a context of national lobbying, she “was speaking very seriously to [the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport] and [the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities] in terms of the future of our leisure industry… because for me, not only does it stimulate the economy, but it also stimulates and supports our mental health ”.


Source link

]]>
Local government faces ‘threatening’ legal risks regarding use of AI services https://devolved.net/local-government-faces-threatening-legal-risks-regarding-use-of-ai-services/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 11:56:43 +0000 https://devolved.net/local-government-faces-threatening-legal-risks-regarding-use-of-ai-services/ Dr Sue Chadwick, planning law expert at Pinsent Masons, said it was “clear” that existing regulations were “inadequate” and left local authorities with “difficult choices”. Writing in the Local Government Lawyer, Chadwick said: “It is clear that there are advantages to automating day-to-day local government functions and using data analytics to process large amounts of […]]]>

Dr Sue Chadwick, planning law expert at Pinsent Masons, said it was “clear” that existing regulations were “inadequate” and left local authorities with “difficult choices”.

Writing in the Local Government Lawyer, Chadwick said: “It is clear that there are advantages to automating day-to-day local government functions and using data analytics to process large amounts of information from a variety of sources. in terms of saving time and money and freeing up agents for more complex tasks.

“It is also clear that the regulatory framework for this transformation is inadequate,” she added.

A recent report by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on the Future of Work noted “marked gaps in legal protection” while highlighting the growing prevalence of AI in the workplace.

“For a local authority looking to embrace new digital tools, there are tough choices to make,” Chadwick said.

“On the one hand, there is a need to move forward quickly so that the benefits of technology can be realized. On the flip side, at the very least, there are reputational risks associated with adopting new technologies at a time when levels of public trust in government and new technologies are low. ”

“There may also be imminent legal risks – algorithmic bias has already been used as the basis for successfully challenging the use of facial recognition technology by South Wales Police,” Chadwick added.


Source link

]]>
Our point of view: the consensus made fun of local government reform https://devolved.net/our-point-of-view-the-consensus-made-fun-of-local-government-reform/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 07:39:44 +0000 https://devolved.net/our-point-of-view-the-consensus-made-fun-of-local-government-reform/ Local government reform has turned into a farce. This was inevitable given that the government sought to achieve this goal through a misguided search for consensus. While this is understandable, given that it needs the support of certain parties to push reform through the Legislature, its so-called flexibility has allowed parties and some of the […]]]>

Local government reform has turned into a farce. This was inevitable given that the government sought to achieve this goal through a misguided search for consensus. While this is understandable, given that it needs the support of certain parties to push reform through the Legislature, its so-called flexibility has allowed parties and some of the larger municipalities to dictate what happens. will pass.

It was extremely naive to think that political parties, which were the reason we have an unsustainable number of municipalities, would contribute constructively to reform. And it was colossally foolish to believe that municipalities would do anything other than fight their demise. In the end, we will have 20 communes (maybe 21) instead of the 17 proposed by the government – it was too many anyway – because each party wanted to maintain communes in which it had strong support. And that includes the governing Disy party.

The municipalities that wanted to retain their power finally won their case. For example, Yeroskipou will not be absorbed by the Municipality of Paphos but itself will absorb several village communities and will be known as the Municipality of West Paphos. Oddly, there will also be a Municipality of East Paphos and a Municipality of Paphos (central?). In addition to the municipalities of eastern, western and central Limassol, there will also be one for Polemidia. Famagusta district will have three municipalities, as Ayia Napa did not want to be absorbed by Paralimni and it will remain intact, absorbing Sotira and Liopetri, and the third will be Dherynia which is a stronghold of Akel.

Ultimately, the so-called reform could reduce the number of municipalities and community councils, but it is unlikely to achieve its main objectives – streamlining local government, improving services, reducing costs and, ultimately, viability. Twenty municipalities for a country of a million inhabitants is still too much and not very profitable. The government should have come up with six major local authorities for the parties to increase the number to 10, which would have been manageable, and would have prevented Ayia Napa, Yeroskipou and others from fighting their demise.

Instead now, because the reform has to be approved by the end of the year, for the purposes of EU funding, the government is at the total mercy of the parties that know it and profit from it. Most even supported Akel’s silly proposal to hold separate referendums on proposed mergers in each new municipality, which would allow “no” votes in one to derail the whole reform. On the positive side, referendums will take place in two years, when the idea could be scrapped.

This approximation to reform could be further disfigured over the coming week as parties are expected to put the finishing touches on the government’s proposal.


Source link

]]>
Most local government offices are closed today due to the Thanksgiving holiday: NorthEscambia.com https://devolved.net/most-local-government-offices-are-closed-today-due-to-the-thanksgiving-holiday-northescambia-com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 06:04:38 +0000 https://devolved.net/most-local-government-offices-are-closed-today-due-to-the-thanksgiving-holiday-northescambia-com/ Most local government offices are closed on Fridays due to the Thanksgiving long weekend. The following Escambia County offices are closed on Fridays (with exceptions noted below): Escambia County Council of County Commissioners All Departments West Florida Public Libraries at all locations Escambia County Real Estate Appraiser Escambia County Tax Collector Circuit Court Clerk and […]]]>

Most local government offices are closed on Fridays due to the Thanksgiving long weekend.

The following Escambia County offices are closed on Fridays (with exceptions noted below):

  • Escambia County Council of County Commissioners All Departments
  • West Florida Public Libraries at all locations
  • Escambia County Real Estate Appraiser
  • Escambia County Tax Collector
  • Circuit Court Clerk and Escambia County Comptroller
  • Administration of waste management services
  • Supervisor of the Election Office
  • ECAT administrative offices
  • Escambia County Animal Welfare and Adoption Center is closed on Fridays, open regular hours on Saturdays
  • The Perdido dump is open on Friday
  • ECAT buses are on a normal Friday schedule
  • UWF express cart resumes service on Saturday, campus cart service returns on Monday

Century City

  • All Town of Century offices and services are closed on Fridays. There is no change to garbage collection.

Emerald Coast Public Services Authority

  • ECUA offices are closed on Friday. All Friday residential sanitation, recycling and yard waste collections will take place on Saturday. There is no change for business customers.


Source link

]]>
Can the local government continue at this pace? https://devolved.net/can-the-local-government-continue-at-this-pace/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 14:47:24 +0000 https://devolved.net/can-the-local-government-continue-at-this-pace/ As we continue to fight the pandemic, the campaign to recover and rebuild our nation is well advanced. Huge efforts by central and local government, frontline service providers and the citizens themselves have brought us this far, but to steal a line from Winston Churchill: “Now this is not the case. end. It’s not even […]]]>

As we continue to fight the pandemic, the campaign to recover and rebuild our nation is well advanced. Huge efforts by central and local government, frontline service providers and the citizens themselves have brought us this far, but to steal a line from Winston Churchill: “Now this is not the case. end. It’s not even the beginning of the end. But maybe this is the end of the beginning… ”Returning to some form of pre-pandemic lifestyle is going to take years, and things will certainly be different when we do.

Even in the darkest hours of 18 months, there have been countless uplifting stories and greater appreciation for the unsung heroes of our communities and public services. Working together, the councils have accomplished a lot, responding in weeks when previously it would have taken months or years due to politics, budgets or the complex web of council governance. It has shown the nation how valuable local government is and the potential, if we choose, to seize this unique opportunity for change.

A great opportunity

In a recent survey we conducted with YouGov, we asked senior leaders from various industries to assess how they and their organizations fared during the crisis and their prospects for the future. Unsurprisingly, in local government, an industry at the forefront of the fight, 72% said the pandemic had negatively impacted their board, with 65% indicating a negative impact on them personally. When asked about the next six months, 86% expected a transformation in the service or organization, while 81% expected a transformation in the local government sector.

There were some positives. 86% saw their organization evolve faster than expected and 61% collaborate more with their peers to achieve their goals. Adoption of new technology was rated “good” or “very good” by 86% of boards, with half saying productivity had increased (around 25% said it had decreased).

The most surprising result was the 44% who said the current pace of change could be sustained over the next 12 months and the 7% who thought it could be faster.

Finally, many believed that the next 12 months would bring further disruption. The results suggest that there have been changes in employee expectations about work and that organizations need to rethink how and where work is done as we emerge from the pandemic. Despite the clear sense of disturbance, there were also positive signals. Respondents indicated that they collaborate more with other organizations, that they are more willing to embrace innovative ideas, and that there are suggestions that the shift to remote working has led to higher levels. individual productivity. Despite the scale of disruption encountered, resilience, adaptability and a sense that the crisis may in fact be a catalyst for change were all highlighted in the results.

Rhythm transformation

Unsurprisingly perhaps, finance and funding have been seen as the top challenges for the industry over the next 12 months as executives grapple with shrinking incomes, a lack of funds and growing demand, along with the burden. to allow local recovery. On a personal level, burnout and adaptation challenges are at the heart of concerns. So how do we maintain this pace, as 44% believe, while ensuring that we and our teams don’t give in to the pressure?

Adopt a mindset of resilience

In the short term, funding for key services is not going to improve dramatically. Without careful management, the accumulated holidays of millions of people could be taken in December to enjoy a longer than usual Christmas vacation. Well deserved, but demand will remain high for a while and will need to be met. The first step is to reach out to partners and peers who can support you despite a peak in demand or a lack of resources, but it is worth considering mid-term measures such as service redesign and some automation to free up time for officers.

Go digital differently

Many councils have moved services to digital channels during the pandemic as a necessity. But, while the move to portals and web services has provided access to citizens, much of the underlying process is still mandraulic or a digital replication of the old process. Taking the time to rethink these processes, automate administration and open up new channels to citizens takes time, but must be considered as the long-term benefits are significant from a cost of service perspective and the welfare of officers.

Go deep into the data

Turning raw data into insight, then intelligence and insight will be essential if we are to proactively manage demand. Legacy systems, technical debt, and the inability to share easily between departments and agencies make this step difficult. Past efforts in other sectors have not always been seen as successful and councils still have to deal with citizens whose views on the use and sharing of data are mixed and often very emotional. While we can continue to evolve our approach to data within local government, I believe we have the opportunity to transform everything from our data infrastructures, our hardware parks, our software, our citizen interfaces to IoT to within the community.

Always put the customer first

It’s not just organizations that have had to radically rethink the way they deliver services – citizens and businesses have also had ample time to rethink how they want to engage with public services. With so many individuals and businesses now based from home, previous geographic restrictions and the importance of face-to-face contact are less important, but transparent and intuitive customers are. Make sure you listen to how your customers want to interact with your organization rather than assuming they too want to revert to pre-COVID-19 customs and practices. Be brave and take this opportunity to redesign your services and processes around your customers.

it won’t be easy

I don’t think we can keep this pace any longer without transformative thinking and courageous action from all who serve citizens in communities across the UK. I don’t think the transformation will be easy. Public sector leaders will need to maintain and build on the cultural changes that the pandemic has enabled – openness to innovation, speed of decision-making and pace of change. Local government leaders will also need to become inter-organizational leaders, bringing together the best ideas and capacities from the public, private and third sectors. Organizations that can continue to build on the momentum created by the necessities of COVID-19 will reap significant benefits. The future may well favor the courageous.

Paul Abraham is Managing Director and Client Partner of Capita Local Public Services

  • To find out how we are helping local authorities transform, please contact me for an informal conversation at paul.abraham@capita.com

This article is sponsored content for The GM


Source link

]]>
Local government closures for Thanksgiving https://devolved.net/local-government-closures-for-thanksgiving/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 11:58:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/local-government-closures-for-thanksgiving/ (WYDaily / Courtesy of Unsplash) HISTORICAL TRIANGLE – Below is a compiled list of local government shutdowns for the Thanksgiving holiday (Thursday, November 25, 2021) James City County Wednesday 24 November 2021: The courts will close at noon on Wednesday November 24, 2021. Thusday., 25 Nov and Fri 26 Nov 2021: All county offices will […]]]>
(WYDaily / Courtesy of Unsplash)

HISTORICAL TRIANGLE – Below is a compiled list of local government shutdowns for the Thanksgiving holiday (Thursday, November 25, 2021)


James City County

Wednesday 24 November 2021:

  • The courts will close at noon on Wednesday November 24, 2021.

Thusday., 25 Nov and Fri 26 Nov 2021:

  • All county offices will be closed Thursday, November 25 and Friday, November 26
  • James City County Recreation Center and Abram Frink Jr. Community Center will be closed Thursday, November 25
  • All county parks will remain open Thursday, November 25 and Friday, November 26
  • Chickahominy Riverfront Park, Little Creek Reservoir Park, James City County Marina and Freedom Park offices / stores will be closed Thursday, November 25 and Friday, November 26
  • Convenience stores on Tewning Road and Jolly Pond Road will be closed on Thursday, November 25. The Toano convenience store is closed
  • The garbage transfer station is closed on Thursday, November 25
  • The selective collection will be delayed by one day from Thursday, November 25 to Saturday, November 27.
  • Libraries will be closed Thursday November 25 and Friday November 26
  • The courts are closed Thursday Nov 25 and Fri Nov 26.

City of Williamsburg

All City of Williamsburg offices will be closed on Thursday Nov. 25 and Fri. Nov. 26, 2021. This will include the offices of the municipal building located on Lafayette Street as well as the Quarterpath recreation center.

Wednesday 24 November 2021:

  • Williamsburg-James City County Courthouse on Monticello Avenue will close at noon

Thursday Nov 25 and Fri Nov 26 2021:

  • Williamsburg-James City County Courthouse to be closed
  • Waller Mill Park will be closed on Thursdays. (Nov 25) but will follow regular business hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) on Fri. Nov. 26

It is important to note that the holiday closures do not have an impact on waste or recycling in the city. Williamsburg would like to note that while it’s Blue Road week for leaf collection, it won’t happen on Thursday, November 25, or Friday. November 26.

Residents who have water or sewer emergencies are encouraged to call (757) 220-2331.


York County

Most operations including the Virginia Peninsulas Public Service Authority (VPPSA) composting facility, Goodwin Neck transfer station and Citizen Drop-off for recycling and / or garbage disposal will follow normal hours. operating on Friday (November 26) and Saturday (November) 27).

Wednesday 24 November 2021:

  • York County Public Libraries will close at 5 p.m.
  • York County Courts will close at noon
  • Virginia Cooperative Extension will close at noon

Thursday 25 Nov and Friday 26 Nov 2021:

  • County government offices will be closed on both days
  • York County Public Libraries will be closed on both days
  • York-Poquoson social services will be closed on both days
  • Virginia Cooperative Extension will be closed on both days
  • All courts will be closed on both days
  • The administration of the waste management center will be closed on both days
  • Waste management operations will be closed on Thursday November 25 only

It is important to note that the garbage and recycling collections that are scheduled for Thursday, November 25 will be delayed by one day and will be delayed until all collections are completed on Saturday, November 27.

Always be informed. Click here to get the latest news and information delivered to your inbox


Source link

]]>
Ministers accused of backtracking on local shared prosperity fund task force https://devolved.net/ministers-accused-of-backtracking-on-local-shared-prosperity-fund-task-force/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 13:06:17 +0000 https://devolved.net/ministers-accused-of-backtracking-on-local-shared-prosperity-fund-task-force/ The government has been accused of a lack of urgency to deliver on its pledge to appoint a task force comprising political leaders from local governments to engage with officials on the design of the UK’s Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF). An announcement on the UKSPF’s investment program, which is intended to replace EU funding, is […]]]>

The government has been accused of a lack of urgency to deliver on its pledge to appoint a task force comprising political leaders from local governments to engage with officials on the design of the UK’s Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF).

An announcement on the UKSPF’s investment program, which is intended to replace EU funding, is expected early next year ahead of its launch in April. This leaves little time for the sector to provide their views to Whitehall on how the fund should be deployed.

The government has already announced during the spending review that £ 560m from the fund – which will be worth £ 0.4bn in 2022-2023, £ 0.7bn in 2023-24 and 1.5 billion pounds sterling in 2024-25 – will be spent on a new program to boost adult numeracy skills.

The LGA has always called for the creation of a UKSPF working group between central and local government, both at member and officer level, but its efforts seem to have fallen on deaf ears.

The Ministry of Leveling, Housing and Communities held three quick succession agent-level working group meetings ahead of the expenditure review, chaired by the Deputy Director of its Cities and Local Growth Unit, who is responsible for the design of the fund.

The working group underlined the need for any future engagement to have a political level, as well as the need for greater collaboration in the design of the fund, explained a report to the LGA People and Places Council. .

But there do not appear to be any plans in place for future meetings of the working group, despite the fact that the LGA “stresses the urgency of establishing a political and officer level. [taskforce] which has a real influence on the design of the UKSPF ”.

Board chairman Kevin Bentley (Con) told the committee this week how, before the UK leaves the EU, the LGA’s Brexit task force – which he chaired the era – had persuaded the minister then at the head of the agenda to accept that there would be a local political presence of the government in the working group of the UKSPF.

He warned the council yesterday that “without political involvement we will start to lose ground.”

LGA policy adviser Paul Green told the board: “We urgently call on officials to ensure that there is a [taskforce], as well as the extension of that of officer. They don’t react as quickly as they should. The head of escalation policy [this] with officials.

Cllr Bentley, who is also the chief of Essex CC, told the committee: “Let’s send a letter, signed by James [Jamieson] as president of the AGL as well as myself and the president of the council of the regions of the city. We have to put that marker very clearly now and repeat it over and over again, because if we don’t get the political meeting, we will lose the momentum.

“I’ve been pretty close to it, so I feel very passionate about it. “

The UKSPF was originally featured in the Conservative Party’s 2017 general election manifesto, with the £ 220million community renewal fund that was launched in March and intended to serve as a pilot program for the fund.

The LGA has criticized the way projects were selected for this fund, like so many others, through a competitive bidding process. Cllr Bentley warned that without political commitment, “we will get more of this competition. [element] and not in fact [government] work with us so that the money is distributed where it needs to be ”.

In addition, Mr. Green stressed the importance of the fund being “co-designed with local government” so that the sector is able to convey to government the “negative aspects” of “the impact of competition”.

South Oxfordshire Councilor Sue Roberts (Ind) told the board she could understand why EU funding “has to be done through a competitive bidding process”, but said added that “our own UK money should not come from competitive bonuses like this”.

She pointed out that an AGL report on the UKSPF highlights how the competitive structure “prevents collaborative work to get us to bid against our neighbors” and how the fund “does not have the longevity or amount of funding of the EU in any respect ”.

“Green financing, according to the government committee on climate change, has also suffered from the stop-start nature of the financing,” she continued.

“Whenever we talk to government about funding, we shouldn’t be encouraging them to take these stop-start approaches. We need consistent funding that is properly allocated to local councils, so that we can do our work properly. “

Cumbria CC advisor Stan Collins (Lib Dem) suggested that “the reason officials favor bidding processes is that boards are forced to employ bid writers, either in as consultants, be full time and how often do we find that these consultants are retired public servants? “

“It’s just another form of distinguished corruption.”

A DLUHC spokesperson said: “The Secretary of State and Ministers have met with the LGA and plan to meet with relevant local government organizations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as part of the pledge. continuous work of the department with local authorities.

“The Secretary of State is always happy to listen to the views of the local government. “


Source link

]]>
Concern over Cipfa’s plan to toughen up the prudential code https://devolved.net/concern-over-cipfas-plan-to-toughen-up-the-prudential-code/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 15:16:21 +0000 https://devolved.net/concern-over-cipfas-plan-to-toughen-up-the-prudential-code/ The Chartered Institute for Public Finance and Accountancy (Cipfa) has been urged to “rethink” proposed changes to its prudential code, fearing that the plans limit the ability of boards to make legitimate investment decisions. Cipfa’s consultation on the prudential code, which closed on November 16, proposed stricter guidelines on the capacity of local authorities to […]]]>

The Chartered Institute for Public Finance and Accountancy (Cipfa) has been urged to “rethink” proposed changes to its prudential code, fearing that the plans limit the ability of boards to make legitimate investment decisions.

Cipfa’s consultation on the prudential code, which closed on November 16, proposed stricter guidelines on the capacity of local authorities to borrow to invest.

But at a meeting of the Local Government Association’s resource board yesterday, councilors expressed concern over the perceived lack of clarity around the proposed changes and their potential consequences.

The LGA’s draft response to the consultation states: “While what is proposed is not entirely clear, it is possible to interpret the proposals here to mean that local authorities should prioritize the safety of the community. the cash value of investments above all else. “

Gloucestershire CC member Mark Hawthorne (Con) told the meeting: “The way I see this potentially having an impact is for local authorities to act as vehicles for regeneration. “

He gave the example of the purchase by municipalities of old shopping centers which require investment, but which “in the long term will be profitable for the community”.

“It’s not clear in these rules, whether as part of the very strict overhaul, that this will be something that will be recommended or permitted,” said Cllr Hawthorne.

Echoing these concerns, Peter Marland (Lab), the head of Milton Keynes Council, said: “We should not stray from the reality that this code is indeed trying to stop borrowing before the need arises.

Some meeting participants suggested that the changes could be politically motivated. Richard Wenham (Con) of Central Bedfordshire Council explained: “We see this is a technical consultation but behind it is a land grab by the central, be it Treasury, officials or whatever. , for the independence of local councils in order to take democratic decisions. on what they invest.

“It’s just another opportunity to restrict our freedom of movement, whether it’s to regenerate a dilapidated area, or to try to make prudent investments to accelerate economic growth.”

Concerns were also expressed that the uncertain financial situation affecting a small number of municipalities may have influenced the changes proposed by Cipfa.

“The elephant in the room is that someone, somewhere, thinks that a small number of councils have either been poorly invested or over-invested,” said Richard Kemp, leader of the Lib Dem group at Liverpool City Council.

“I can only assume that somewhere there is some pressure on them.”

Eastleigh DC chief Keith House (Lib Dem) called the proposed changes “overbroad of mission”.

“As the head of the district council, this is a very important part of our financial strategy as we have been able to reduce the housing tax in real terms… and maintain the services”.

“It’s not coming because we haven’t managed our finances properly. “

Referring to this part of the proposed changes, Bevis Ingram, Senior Financial Advisor at the LGA, said: “Cipfa needs to think it over again and clarify exactly what the code means.”


Source link

]]>
Break: APGA chief Victor Umeh expelled from local government secretariat in Ihiala Nigeria news https://devolved.net/break-apga-chief-victor-umeh-expelled-from-local-government-secretariat-in-ihiala-nigeria-news/ https://devolved.net/break-apga-chief-victor-umeh-expelled-from-local-government-secretariat-in-ihiala-nigeria-news/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 16:58:16 +0000 https://devolved.net/break-apga-chief-victor-umeh-expelled-from-local-government-secretariat-in-ihiala-nigeria-news/ The additional election of Anambra announced by INEC is currently underway in the local government of Ihiala Meanwhile, All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA) is confident in winning the additional Anambra state elections According to the report, Victor Umeh, was turned away after going to Ihiala LGA with his entourage A former national president of the […]]]>
  • The additional election of Anambra announced by INEC is currently underway in the local government of Ihiala
  • Meanwhile, All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA) is confident in winning the additional Anambra state elections
  • According to the report, Victor Umeh, was turned away after going to Ihiala LGA with his entourage

A former national president of the All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA), Victor Umeh, was turned away from the seat of local government in Ihiala.

Victor Umeh, who arrived at LGA headquarters with other party members, was turned away by the GOC, 82 Division.

The GOC reportedly shouted at Umeh, saying:

“You are not supposed to be here.

In his reaction, Umeh reportedly insisted that he was there “to make sure things were going well.”

INEC has yet to start additional elections in Ihiala

Recall that Legit.ng reported that in the early hours of Monday, November 8, the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) suspended the compilation of the results of the election of Governor of Anambra on November 6 and declared that an election additional would be held on Tuesday, November 9. to the local government of Ihiala before 10 a.m.

Read also

Right in: Anambra gubernatorial candidate votes for Soludo, proves right

However, almost an hour after the INEC announced that the exercise was going to start, this is not the case.

Can Soludo still lose the ballot for governor? Here are the possible reasons

Legit.ng had reported that to many election observers, the former governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) and candidate of the All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA) in the current elections for governor of Anambra State, Professor Charles Soludo is the next governor of Anambra State.

This conclusion will be based on the fact that he has the most votes in the election, having won in 18 of the 20 LGAs where the election was held.

He won 103,946 votes, followed by Valentine Ozigbo of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP) who won 51,322 votes, while Andy Uba, candidate of the All Progressives Congress (APC), had 42,942.

With this, the margin between Soludo and Ozigbo currently stands at 52,624. But the tide may still tip against the former governor of the CBN. Even if it will be difficult, but it is politics, it is still possible.

Source: Legit.ng News


Source link

]]>
https://devolved.net/break-apga-chief-victor-umeh-expelled-from-local-government-secretariat-in-ihiala-nigeria-news/feed/ 0