Local government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ Tue, 10 May 2022 16:17:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://devolved.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Local government – Devolved http://devolved.net/ 32 32 The Queen’s Speech could provide pathways to the next level https://devolved.net/the-queens-speech-could-provide-pathways-to-the-next-level/ Tue, 10 May 2022 16:17:37 +0000 https://devolved.net/the-queens-speech-could-provide-pathways-to-the-next-level/ Putting the white paper’s decentralization framework on a legal footing should be seen as a victory for localism, writes Jonathan Werran, chief executive of Localis. After surviving last Friday’s local elections, it looks like the circus is moving on to the Queen’s Speech and the last chance to reset the Johnson government’s agenda through the […]]]>

Putting the white paper’s decentralization framework on a legal footing should be seen as a victory for localism, writes Jonathan Werran, chief executive of Localis.

After surviving last Friday’s local elections, it looks like the circus is moving on to the Queen’s Speech and the last chance to reset the Johnson government’s agenda through the vellum legislature before the curtain falls on the upcoming national polls .

For the local government, all eyes will be on the leveling and regeneration bill. As a bill, it had the kind of casting changes that have been associated with Doctor Who since it was first mentioned in the Queen’s Speech in December 2019, following the election. general for that month.

In order to stick to the wall the dozen or so top-down upgrade missions outlined in the white paper, they must be enshrined in law and progress must be tracked annually. Learning from the past, even setting targets in the legislative stone against an annual review could prove beyond the ability of the combined range of central government departments to, in hallowed civil service parlance, “condemn the ‘success agenda’.

Taking just one example, the white paper reaffirmed the government‘s ambition to improve healthy life expectancy by five years by the middle of the next decade, while closing the gap between the experience of richest and poorest in society. Analysis by the Health Foundation last month indicated that, based on a return to pre-pandemic trends, this goal would take an incredible 192 years to achieve.

Putting the decentralization framework on a legal footing to give county agreements a chance to live and breathe, following the three-tier incentive model outlined in the white paper, should be seen as a victory for localism. The question now is how much political capital remains in the kitty, and how much administrative weight will be transmitted through the levers of the soon-to-be-appointed regional leveling directors and their support staff in the cities and local growth unit, by the general election.

The local government finance rubber is getting in the way of the regeneration and future shape of our high streets in the form of the Non-Domestic Rating Bill.

The government’s commitment to addressing the long-standing issue of absentee landlords stunting regeneration efforts and keeping high streets in stasis closed by keeping properties empty will be welcomed by councils across the country.

That said, we should be aware of the devilry in the details as local authorities attempt to navigate both technical and logistical policy challenges – particularly for properties where the identity of the owner is not easily established. – and the government must ensure councils receive support to open up this new frontier for place-making policy. If not, it will be the third successive failure to respond to a well-signaled shift after the previous stalled reaction to the outlying retail boom and then the online shopping revolution.

After nearly half a decade of dithering, any progress on corporate rate reform is to some degree welcome, and the government’s proposals are substantial to address some of the system’s problems.

However, the general problem of the calculation and underlying logic of corporate tariffs being outdated and unfit for purpose cannot be solved by reform of this nature. Bottom-up reform that reassesses the role of local businesses and main street amenities in our society is ultimately needed.

Nestled in the embrace of it all are the remnants of what was previously self-contained radical planning for the future housing program whose frontline algorithms did not survive their first encounter with backbenchers. Tories, not to mention the outcome of the Chesham and Amersham by-election.

Remnants of this – the Build Back Beautiful momentum for design codes and community infrastructure tax reform that empowers communities – have the potential to provide the social and physical infrastructure that will make building locally acceptable. Whether the rather magical thinking inherent in leveling up, that the demographic, economic and social demand for housing in the South East translates mystically into the sunny industrial highlands of the Midlands and the Far North, remains quite another thing.

A role for councils in delivering the social housing ladder signals a return to the post-war consensus that saw Harold ‘Supermac’ Macmillan resourcing local authorities to literally ‘build build build’ until more than 300,000 housing units are delivered. Elsewhere, bills to regulate social housing and private tenancy could set the tone for decency in all tenures.

On the big pieces of infrastructure and net zero transition, the UK infrastructure banking bill will provide funding to local authorities without resorting to that old standby of the Public Works Loan Board or the need to to resort to more alternative funding sources that would make Section 151 officers’ blood run cold.

Whether it is possible for this government or any other government to legislate out of the headwinds of the growing cost of living crisis is a matter for another briefing. So let’s give credit to the fact that there is a progressive legal framework for the powers of establishment that could provide the decentralization pathways and policy avenues for the flagship upgrading agenda to be accomplished.

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North Carolina Local Government Commission Approves $1.5 Billion in Funding Requests | North Carolina https://devolved.net/north-carolina-local-government-commission-approves-1-5-billion-in-funding-requests-north-carolina/ Fri, 06 May 2022 18:17:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/north-carolina-local-government-commission-approves-1-5-billion-in-funding-requests-north-carolina/ (The Center Square) – The North Carolina Commission on Local Government recently approved funding requests for $1.5 billion from across the state, including about $900 million for airports in Charlotte and Ashville. The LGC is chaired by State Treasurer Dale Folwell and staffed by his office, and is responsible for overseeing the financial well-being of […]]]>

(The Center Square) – The North Carolina Commission on Local Government recently approved funding requests for $1.5 billion from across the state, including about $900 million for airports in Charlotte and Ashville.

The LGC is chaired by State Treasurer Dale Folwell and staffed by his office, and is responsible for overseeing the financial well-being of more than 1,100 local government units. The commission examines whether the financing of the projects is reasonable and confirms that the local governments can afford to repay the debt.

The commission met on Tuesday to consider numerous proposals. The LGC approved up to $425 million in revenue bonds for a series of improvements at Charlotte Douglas International Airport to move toward a major terminal expansion and repay an older bond.

The City of Charlotte has secured approval for $300 million in bond anticipation notes for capital improvement projects and to refinance a previous bond anticipation note, according to a press release from Folwell. .

The LGC authorized the Greater Asheville Regional Airport Authority to use $185 million in revenue bonds to expand and modernize the terminal, ticket hall, TSA screening, baggage claim and concession area. The bonds, which are set to go on sale May 19, will also go to a centralized energy plant and an air traffic control tower.

Other major demands approved on Tuesday include a Cabarrus County proposal to issue $160 million in limited obligation bonds to build and equip a new courthouse, elementary school, emergency medical services headquarters , a library and a center for the elderly, among other projects. The LGC also granted approval for another $113.7 million in Limited Obligation Reimbursement Bonds for the county to repay balances of an outstanding draw note for projects previously approved by the commission.

The Cabarrus County Water and Sewer Authority has received approval for $85 million in revenue bonds to continue the expansion of the Rocky River Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility, which will increase its capacity to 26.5 million to 30 million gallons per day.

Orange County’s application has been approved for $43.2 million in limited obligation bonds for the construction of the Orange County South Branch Library, the purchase of public vehicles and several construction projects. schools and counties.

The LGC also approved $12.6 million in installment funding for the construction of a 51,884-square-foot, three-story building and 171-space parking lot in Carrboro to house the South Branch Library of the Orange County, the city’s Recreation, Parks and Cultural Resources Program, and the Orange County Skills Development Center.

Goodwill Industries of eastern North Carolina has obtained LGC approval for up to $60 million in revenue bonds through the North Carolina Capital Facilities Finance Agency, which will be used to purchase 42 stores retail and donation centers, and to refinance a temporary promissory note.

Durham City was also approved for $30.5 million in general obligation repayment bonds to save about $1.8 million from lower interest rates.

Other significant demands granted by the LGC on Tuesday include $25.5 million in revenue repayment bonds for Johnson & Wales University, $21.1 million in funding for the workforce development center works and up to $14 million for an installment contract in Lexington to construct a one-stop administrative building.

More information about applications approved by the LGC is available on the State Treasurer’s website.

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Mental Health Board Hears Sheriff Talk About Cramped Jail Issues | local government https://devolved.net/mental-health-board-hears-sheriff-talk-about-cramped-jail-issues-local-government/ Thu, 05 May 2022 16:31:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/mental-health-board-hears-sheriff-talk-about-cramped-jail-issues-local-government/ Geauga County Sheriff Scott Hildenbrand made a presentation to the Geauga County Board of Mental Health at its April 20 board meeting about the difficult conditions at the Geauga County Security Center. The security center, located at 12450 Merritt Rd., treated 1,887 inmates in 2021. Medical staff saw 77 inmates for psychiatric treatment. Of the […]]]>

Geauga County Sheriff Scott Hildenbrand made a presentation to the Geauga County Board of Mental Health at its April 20 board meeting about the difficult conditions at the Geauga County Security Center.

The security center, located at 12450 Merritt Rd., treated 1,887 inmates in 2021. Medical staff saw 77 inmates for psychiatric treatment.

Of the 182 beds in the prison, there are 9 admission cells. Inmates who arrive at the prison while they have a mental health condition, are intoxicated, in chemical withdrawal or as a result of a violent crime must be placed in these nine cells. They must be eliminated before they can enter the general population.

As of April 20, the prison had 65 male inmates and 13 female inmates. Eighty percent of inmates at the jail have a mental health condition, some more serious than others, Sheriff Hildenbrand said.

Thirty-four percent of inmates take medication. The prison spent $34,200 on this drug in one year. A prisoner had to be vaccinated at the cost of $1,000 a month for nine months. Part of the money spent on psychotropic drugs is reimbursed by the state.

Over the past year, the number of mental health problems in the prison has steadily increased, with medical staff calling for increased monitoring of these prisoners, which has caused the nine admission cells to fill quickly and stay filled, Sheriff Hildenbrand said. There were times when nonviolent prisoners could not be accepted into prison.

The doctor and nurse practitioner are strained, and the prison therapist is gone, with unsuccessful attempts to replace her.

Consequently, many prisoners are not treated for their mental health.

“Cases like this are so tragic because they are preventable,” Sheriff Hildenbrand said. “The sad truth is that, despite improvements over the past 30 years, correctional systems continue to struggle to meet the vast needs of the growing number of mentally ill prisoners.

The other disconnect comes when many prisoners leave prison with no safe place to go.

“We need someone to watch them,” Sheriff Hildenbrand said. “In this industry, we’ve all seen people who are fine while taking their medication, but when they stop, they have problems.”

Chair Jennifer Malainy said the council was honored to have Sheriff Hildenbrand at the meeting.

“We appreciate him and all of our Geauga County MPs,” Ms. Malainy said.

Following Sheriff Hildenbrand’s presentation, Ms. Malainy requested that a follow-up item be placed on the agenda for next month’s regular board meeting, scheduled for May 25. At that time, the council will re-evaluate the sheriff’s words and requests and plan possible next steps.

The board also approved Torchlight’s request for additional funding of $25,000, for a total of $85,000 for 2022 and 2023.

The Geauga County Mental Health and Recovery Board helps fund two of the five programs Torchlight offers: the community mentorship and foster care transition programs, Malainy said.

Torchlight has requested a specified amount of funding for the state’s 2022 fiscal year. The board granted a partial distribution and asked them to come back to the board to request more funds if/when needed.

Torchlight has measured results and so far, according to Director Tia Lawrence, it has been amazing to see the difference and impact the foster care transition program has had on young people.

Ms Lawrence said Torchlight is very grateful to the Mental Health and Recovery Council for supporting his program and providing funds so he can continue to help community members.

The board will continue to monitor funding needs across all agencies, Ms Malainy said.

The board met in executive session to discuss hiring a lawyer.

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Harnessing data to build better local government https://devolved.net/harnessing-data-to-build-better-local-government/ Sun, 01 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/harnessing-data-to-build-better-local-government/ A quiet shift is underway in local government in San Antonio and other major cities in Texas. The movement, with the support of mayors and city managers, is led by young, tech-savvy professionals who believe citizens can be better served through the use of smart data and a new commitment to a more great transparency […]]]>

A quiet shift is underway in local government in San Antonio and other major cities in Texas. The movement, with the support of mayors and city managers, is led by young, tech-savvy professionals who believe citizens can be better served through the use of smart data and a new commitment to a more great transparency and collaboration.

This cohort of talented leaders also believe that smart and proactive use of technology is essential to protect government infrastructure and services that remain highly vulnerable. Winter storm Uri showed local leaders the vulnerability of the city’s energy infrastructure. What if state-sanctioned hackers, rather than nature, were targeting strategic assets here?

These and other challenges were the subject of roundtables Thursday and Friday in Port San Antonio, the hub of the city‘s growing cybersecurity industry. The event was the fourth Texas Smart Cities Summithoused in the brand new $70 million Tech Port Center and Arena.

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RSPCA NSW Adoption and Education Center opens https://devolved.net/rspca-nsw-adoption-and-education-center-opens/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 04:25:06 +0000 https://devolved.net/rspca-nsw-adoption-and-education-center-opens/ Dominic Perrottet – Premier of NSWWendy Tuckerman – Minister of Local Government Wednesday, April 27, 2022 A multi-million upgrade to the RSPCA NSW adoption and education center in western Sydney was officially opened today by Prime Minister Dominic Perrottet, Local Government Minister Wendy Tuckerman and the CEO of RSPCA Steve Coleman. Sydney’s new state-of-the-art adoption […]]]>

Dominic Perrottet – Premier of NSW
Wendy Tuckerman – Minister of Local Government

Wednesday, April 27, 2022

A multi-million upgrade to the RSPCA NSW adoption and education center in western Sydney was officially opened today by Prime Minister Dominic Perrottet, Local Government Minister Wendy Tuckerman and the CEO of RSPCA Steve Coleman.

Sydney’s new state-of-the-art adoption and education center has been jointly funded by the NSW government and the RSPCA NSW animal-lover community, with the state government investing $12 million in the upgrade to transform the animal shelter and expand the organization. ability.

Mr Perrottet, the boss of the RSPCA NSW, said the NSW Government‘s investment demonstrated its continued commitment to animal welfare.

“This is NSW’s largest animal shelter, and has been helping families reunite with their forever pets for over 40 years,” Mr Perrottet said.

“The NSW Government is very proud to support the excellent work done by the RSPCA NSW, and I congratulate CEO Steve Coleman and his team for creating a center that will continue to raise animal welfare standards, at the Following changes to the law last year meaning NSW now has the toughest animal welfare penalty suites in Australia.

“Yagoona’s improved facilities will also help them continue their wonderful work of caring for animals in need and allow even more families to discover the joy of adopting a pet.”

Local Government Minister Wendy Tuckerman said the new education center will host veterinary, staff and volunteer training, community events and school education programs that will benefit future generations by educating them about the good – to be animal.

“Animals are such an important part of our lives, and each year the RSPCA NSW manages the veterinary treatment, care, rehabilitation and rehoming of nearly 45,000 cats, dogs, horses, livestock and other animals,” said said Ms. Tuckerman.

“Our investment in the shelter has also supported local jobs, using locally made precast concrete,” said RSPCA NSW CEO Steve Coleman, saying it wouldn’t have been possible without the NSW Government and the thanked for their continued support.

“It is an honor to have the Prime Minister here today to open the center which is central to our mission, providing a place of refuge for animals and animal lovers,” Mr Coleman said.

“The Prime Minister first took an interest when he was treasurer and made sure funding for animal welfare was a priority. This modern facility is the result of the hard work of our donors and the state government.

“Thanks to the support of the government and community of NSW, we continue to provide the largest animal welfare enforcement unit in Australia, with a team of inspectors dedicated to investigating cases of animal cruelty to across NSW, responding to over 15,000 cruelty complaints a year. ”

The $29 million upgrade will help RSPCA NSW continue to prioritize the physical and emotional well-being of its animals, with cutting-edge innovations including acoustically controlled kennels, hydronic underfloor heating and environmental enrichment mechanisms in design.

Animal lovers, neighbours, friends, families, the community at large are welcome to visit the RSPCA NSW, meet the animals, adopt or foster, volunteer, do a donation and help create a better future. For more information, visit www.rspcansw.org.au

MEDIA: Amber Muir | prime minister | 0447 695 520
Damien Bolté | Minister Tuckerman | 0498 359 624

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Louisiana House Passes Bill to Ban State and Local Government COVID Vaccination Mandates | Louisiana https://devolved.net/louisiana-house-passes-bill-to-ban-state-and-local-government-covid-vaccination-mandates-louisiana/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 18:17:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/louisiana-house-passes-bill-to-ban-state-and-local-government-covid-vaccination-mandates-louisiana/ (The Center Square) — Legislation prohibiting state and local governments from requiring proof of a COVID-19 vaccination to enter public places and private businesses cleared the House this week. Lawmakers voted 64-31 to approve House Bill 990sponsored by Rep. Thomas Pressly, R-Shreveport, to prohibit state and local governments from requiring proof of vaccination as a […]]]>

(The Center Square) — Legislation prohibiting state and local governments from requiring proof of a COVID-19 vaccination to enter public places and private businesses cleared the House this week.

Lawmakers voted 64-31 to approve House Bill 990sponsored by Rep. Thomas Pressly, R-Shreveport, to prohibit state and local governments from requiring proof of vaccination as a condition of entry to public spaces and businesses.

“This bill does three things: First, it prohibits public vaccine warrants for COVID vaccines for entry into public or private property and for receiving goods or services,” Pressly said Wednesday. “It also has in provision B, deals with federal law and avoids preemption issues.

“And then, thirdly, it allows companies to decide whether or not to implement their own policies for their business,” he said.

Rep. Beryl Amedée, R-Gray, offered a amendment to the bill that would have deleted the third provision, which reads “nothing in this part shall be construed or interpreted as prohibiting or otherwise impairing the rights of any private company or other private entity wishing to implement a policy , procedure or requirement regarding COVID -19 vaccines.”

“The deletion of Section C does not affect the overall intent of the bill,” she said. “The intent of the bill is to prohibit government discrimination based on COVID vaccination status. Section C is not necessary to achieve this purpose.

“Keeping Section C is problematic. Section C greenlights, endorses and promotes religious and medical discrimination in the private sector,” she argued.

Representative Raymond Crews, R-Bossier City, also came out in favor of eliminating Section C.

“First of all, I don’t think this paragraph is relevant to the bill at all,” he said. “Secondly, I agree with the precept, but not with the implementation or the result. It restricts individual freedom, and I don’t think it’s necessary.”

AmedeeThe amendment would also have injected the words “valid and enforceable” with respect to exempt federal laws into Section B of the bill.

Section B states: “The provisions of this Part do not apply to any COVID-19 vaccination mandate that is required under federal law or regulation.”

Amedee argued that the federal government had delegated the enforcement of vaccination mandates to private companies, “and the mandates are now rescinded.”

Pressly opposed the two amendments proposed by Amédée.

“I think it’s important to… make it very clear that companies decide what they want to do for their business,” he said. “Companies are owned by individuals, and I think it’s important that we keep that language.”

Pressly argued that the words “valid and enforceable” are unnecessary, citing U.S. Supreme Court precedent in Marbury v. Madison.

“It deals with what the courts are entitled to decide,” he said. “And what they’re saying is the court makes that decision. If it’s not valid federal law, then it’s not valid and enforceable, so it’s just not necessary language. .”

AmedeeThe amendment ultimately failed by a vote of 21-71.

HB 990 is now heading to the Senate for consideration.

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Colin Copus: Local government is not local autonomy https://devolved.net/colin-copus-local-government-is-not-local-autonomy/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 10:41:21 +0000 https://devolved.net/colin-copus-local-government-is-not-local-autonomy/ A new Council of Europe report highlights the limits of local power in the UK, writes the Emeritus Professor of Local Politics at De Montfort University and Visiting Professor at Ghent University. The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe has just published its report on this country’s compliance with the […]]]>

A new Council of Europe report highlights the limits of local power in the UK, writes the Emeritus Professor of Local Politics at De Montfort University and Visiting Professor at Ghent University.

The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe has just published its report on this country’s compliance with the Charter of Local Self-Governmentsigned in 1998, and it’s not fun to read – not for localists anyway.

Colin Copus, Emeritus Professor of Local Politics at De Montfort University and Visiting Professor at Ghent University

Although the report acknowledges that some movement has occurred since the last assessment in 2013, the issues of concern raised at the time have still not been addressed and local government and local communities are suffering due to a highly centralized system of government.

The most important problem that the report highlights has not been addressed since 2013 is the complete absence of any legislative recognition of the principle of local self-government, as required by article two of the charter. The report recognizes that local authorities in this country do not benefit from any real legal protection against interference and control by the central power.

The lack of such integration of local self-government in our system is the reason why we can only speak of local government, rather than as the other 46 member states of the council speak of local self-government. The latter suggests far more autonomy and freedom from central control, interference and oversight than exists for our local government.

Funding overhaul

The report also points out that while some form of general jurisdiction exists, thanks to the first part of the Localism Act 2011, we still fall short of the charter because councils cannot regulate with certainty or predictability the share of local affairs for which they are responsible. because they don’t have the financial resources to do so, nor do they have the freedoms to significantly improve their own financial situation.

Our councils may have general legal competence but they do not have the actual power and capacity to act in the interests of their localities

General competence, in principle, is also strongly controlled and supervised by the center and does not give our local authorities the freedom to act as is the case in the other 46 member states of the Council of Europe.

Our councils, the report says, may have general legal jurisdiction, but they lack the actual power and capacity to act in the interests of their localities. One of the report’s most powerful recommendations concerns a major overhaul of the local government financing system. But we continue to tinker or resist fundamental change for fear of something worse.

A cursory glance at the local authority taxing powers enjoyed by many Council of Europe members shows a much wider basket of powers than those available to our councils – raise your hand who has never paid a tourist tax abroad – but we are still far from obliging tourists from this country to contribute to the local services they consume.

Upgrade

The report highlights the centralized nature of governance in this country and the continued existence of central oversight, regulation, oversight and control of local affairs, and it suggests easing the burden of this monitoring and control.

Given the link between leveling up and decentralization, this recommendation is timely reading, but leveling up as currently configured also links decentralization to centrally set targets and objectives.

In order to avoid over-regulation and centralisation, the report recommends that the Charter of Local Self-Government should become a legally enforceable instrument so that local authorities can apply to the courts to guarantee the free exercise of their powers and responsibilities in order to strengthen their freedom central control – now that would be a radical step for decentralization in this country.

Overall the position of local government here, when opposed to the Charter of Local Self-Government, is not great and shows little or no sign of improvement, but it is worth pointing out. with equal force and clarity by an independent international body.

The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe has done local authorities in this country a great service with its evaluation and report.

It is now up to local government to use this report as a tool for change. The center often promises deconcentration, but offers decentralization – and this dichotomy is very clear in the leveling white paper.

The congress report provided a means of separating deconcentration from decentralization and offered a new basis from which greater freedom and autonomy can be sought for local government. Are we ready to fight?

Read the full report here

Colin Copus, Emeritus Professor of Local Politics, De Montfort University; visiting professor, Ghent University

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Plans for One of Lincoln’s Largest Warehouse Projects Move Forward | local government https://devolved.net/plans-for-one-of-lincolns-largest-warehouse-projects-move-forward-local-government/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://devolved.net/plans-for-one-of-lincolns-largest-warehouse-projects-move-forward-local-government/ What could become one of the city’s biggest industrial projects received a first boost Monday from Lincoln City Council. Omaha developer White Lotus, which is also renovating the Pershing Center block in downtown Lincoln, plans to build nearly 1 million square feet of warehouse space on 71 acres at 65th Street and Arbor Road, near […]]]>

What could become one of the city’s biggest industrial projects received a first boost Monday from Lincoln City Council.

Omaha developer White Lotus, which is also renovating the Pershing Center block in downtown Lincoln, plans to build nearly 1 million square feet of warehouse space on 71 acres at 65th Street and Arbor Road, near from 56th Street and the Interstate 80 interchange.






The Lincoln Logistics Center would be built in three phases, starting with a 309,000 square foot warehouse that could be completed as early as spring 2023, followed by a 368,000 square foot building, then another 309,000 square feet. square feet, for a total of 986,000 square feet of space.

The project will cost approximately $89 million and leverage $13 million in tax increment funding, which allows increased property taxes generated by a development to pay for some upfront costs.

Councilman Tom Beckius said the project, which would be similar to a White Lotus being developed at 132nd Street and Cornhusker Road in Sarpy County, will benefit Lincoln.

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The Omaha project, which is about twice the size of the one proposed at Lincoln, counts among its tenants Amazon, Home Depot and Scooters Coffee.

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The council unanimously approved a resolution Monday that the project was in line with the overall plan. Council will still need to approve an annexation and rezoning, as well as the redevelopment plan.

The City and County Planning Commission approved both the rezoning and the annexation. This included annexing more land than the developer requested in order to comply with the city’s policy of only annexing land that is contiguous to existing city property. One of the owners objected to the inclusion of his land in the annexation.

White Lotus wants to annex 59 acres; the planning department approved the annexation of an additional 50 acres.

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“Mersin Metro is the most important local government project in the history of the region” https://devolved.net/mersin-metro-is-the-most-important-local-government-project-in-the-history-of-the-region/ Sun, 10 Apr 2022 10:30:31 +0000 https://devolved.net/mersin-metro-is-the-most-important-local-government-project-in-the-history-of-the-region/ President Seçer “Mersin Metro is the most important local government project in the history of the region” Mersin Metropolitan Mayor Vahap Seçer was a guest of the live broadcast of the show “Gündem Special” with Aslı Kurtuluş Mutlu, which was broadcast on KRT TV, Kanal 33, İçel TV and Sun RTV. Taking stock of 3 […]]]>
President Seçer “Mersin Metro is the most important local government project in the history of the region”

Mersin Metropolitan Mayor Vahap Seçer was a guest of the live broadcast of the show “Gündem Special” with Aslı Kurtuluş Mutlu, which was broadcast on KRT TV, Kanal 33, İçel TV and Sun RTV. Taking stock of 3 years, President Seçer said: “Mersin deserves much better. Everything will be,” he said.

“The state should also give importance and value to social policies”

Describing Mersin as a city of opportunities, Mayor Seçer said, “In fact, it’s a summary of Turkey, a miniature city.” Stating that the city is not well known enough in terms of tourism, Seçer said: “Imagine that you are a rare flower, you are an exceptional flower, but you have not been discovered. I compare Mersin to him,” he said, adding that they had to promote Mersin.

President Seçer mentioned that agriculture and tourism are expensive sectors with a very high initial investment, and said that it is not possible to keep these areas alive if they are not supported by the State. Explaining that agriculture and tourism make very important contributions to the country’s economy, Seçer said, “Of course, not everything is about economics when running a city or a country. country. Because the state is not commercial, the state is social. The state should also attach importance to social policies, value them and have employment policies. That’s why I care about tourism and agriculture,” he said.

In the March 31 elections, in many major cities like Adana and Mersin, CHP mayors were elected. Kazan President Seçer also referred to the political climate that emerged after the President’s death and said, “During the pandemic, either a member of the National Alliance or a non-Alliance member like me. kazanA huge effort has been made in the municipalities with the Republican People’s Party in the localities mentioned above. In order not to see this, either your heart must be sealed or your eyes must not see biologically,” he said. “Have you been stuck in those 3 years? When asked, Seçer stressed that they are struggling, but they want justice, not discrimination.

“The metro means adding new value to the city”

Mayor Seçer, who shared the details of the metro they laid the foundation for saying, “The metro is the most important local government project in history in this region,” said, “The metro means adding a new value to the city. If you want to turn a city into a brand city, you can turn that city into a brand city with such vision projects. If we want to make Mersin a brand city, we have to do extraordinary things. It has been achieved so far; “We are going to build a metro, we are going to build a rail system”. Years passed, citizens had expectations, but nothing could be done. We are here to do that,” he said. Expressing that it has been 4 months since the Parliament received the authorization to borrow 900 million lira out of the 9 billion lira it will spend on the metro in the first place, President Seçer said that the procedures are wasting weather. President Seçer said: “The foundation has been laid, the construction has begun. Here I want to announce to the people of Mersin. There are also false statements and false propaganda. “I wonder if the metro does not , what happened, the foundation was laid? saying. Our first number one station continues from the area we call the old bus station. Our second station is the area where the current station is located. We needed a permit from the Conservation Council. Last week it was released. Our second station will continue there. The third station is the area where the free children’s park is located. It will continue like this. I need financing and I will borrow. If I wait for a signature for 9 months, my job will be in trouble “This must be done immediately. If the presidency has included this in the investment program, the Treasury should sign the necessary signature and release me as soon as possible” .

“Municipalism; I guess it must be to get into people’s hearts”

Stating that Mersin is a city where there are gaps between the poor and the rich, Seçer said that they support those who are below the poverty and hunger line. Seçer said, “Municipalism probably has to get into people’s hearts. We act with this philosophy. If your citizens are hungry, the path you make for them is worthless. We saw this fact in Mersin,” he said. President Seçer said: “We have actually done what needed to be done” for services such as free bread, hot meals, home care for sick citizens, cleaning their homes, food aid , and said , “It seems wrong to me to call them social assistance. After all, everyone is entitled to the taxes collected. In a sense, we, as a municipality, as a mayor, are intermediaries in order to distribute the shares that accrue to us from the taxes collected by the central government, i.e. the rights of that citizen, in an equitable manner. That is exactly what we are doing,” he said.

“The ratio of our female employees has exceeded 22%”

Highlighting that they were the first municipality to implement the local equality action plan, Seçer recalled that they had included a clause in the collective agreement they had concluded with the employees, stating that they separate from staff who have committed violence against their spouses. Seçer highlighted the need to include more women in working life and said, “When we came to management, the rate of our female employees among all of our employees was not even 18%. Currently, this rate has risen to 22%, or even slightly higher. We want to increase it every day,” he said.

“We have public transport for students 2024 TL until 1”

Stating that there are all kinds of opportunities in the city for a student to choose Mersin, Seçer mentioned the services provided by the metropolitan municipality for young people. Seçer said there were neighborhood kitchens in 30 different locations, the mobile truck went to a neighborhood every day, and there was a neighborhood kitchen at the gate of the university. Saying that 3 types of meals are given for 3.5 TL, Seçer said that they offer food to students 2 days a week for free due to the month of Ramadan. Seçer also addressed the issue of public transport for students and said, “We have public transport for 2024 TL until 1st. We will continue to pay 1 TL to our students,” he said.

Stating that the construction of the digital library in Kültür Park continues, Seçer pointed out that they have opened a very different page for education, and addressed many issues ranging from educational support course centers and to training to cover student examination fees, tuition fees dormitory aids. Seçer emphasized that they contribute to equal opportunities in education and said, “That is what the social state and the social municipality are for.”

Stating that agriculture has become an important area with the pandemic and the subsequent Ukraine-Russia war, Seçer said, while assessing the problems faced as a country in this area, “production costs are very high. Talk about fuel; It tripled in 1 year. Talk about the price of pesticides and fertilizers. The grower cannot add fertilizer. Because there is a huge price increase. As a state, you will take measures against this. “Prices have gone up in the world, my dear, what should we do? You can’t say that,” he said. Mayor Seçer explained that they have created a raising awareness by sending the lemons they purchased from growers to the metropolitan municipalities of Ankara, Istanbul, Tekirdağ and Eskişehir Stressing that it is very important and valuable for them to be together as 3 CHP Metropolitan Mayors, Seçer announced that they will welcome 11 metropolitan mayors to Mer sin between 13 and 15 May.

“Mersin is the shining star of the world, not Turkey”

Stating that he never got tired while serving and that receiving people’s blessings made him happy, Seçer said, “Mersin deserves much better. All will be. It will be a more organized and greener city. It is a city where all living beings live in peace. It will be much more peaceful and prosperous. I say this to Mersin; Mersin is the shining star not only of Turkey but also of the world” and has invited investors to the city.

Addressing the problem of the Syrian guests, President Seçer said that the European Union should allocate resources to them under the coordination of Iller Bank within the framework of FRIT II. Explaining the important projects they have carried out in this context, and stressing that despite the work done, no resources have been allocated, Seçer said: “I have been in service for 3 years, 39 million euros; We also signed the protocol for this; We also had very important projects. We did not receive 39 euros more than 39 million euros,” he said.

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A new operating model for state and local governments https://devolved.net/a-new-operating-model-for-state-and-local-governments/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 15:22:02 +0000 https://devolved.net/a-new-operating-model-for-state-and-local-governments/ HOW THE PANDEMIC ACCELERATED GOVERNMENT CHANGE For those who have said that governments cannot act quickly, our recent experience has shown otherwise. But it’s more than working from home – the public sector must be able to legislate, educate and deliver virtually all kinds of services to citizens. When you see what agencies and localities […]]]>

HOW THE PANDEMIC ACCELERATED GOVERNMENT CHANGE

For those who have said that governments cannot act quickly, our recent experience has shown otherwise. But it’s more than working from home – the public sector must be able to legislate, educate and deliver virtually all kinds of services to citizens. When you see what agencies and localities have done with collaboration tools like WebExconnectivity capabilities such as software-defined wide area networks and applications that sit where they need them for accessibility and security, it’s clear they’re well on their way to creating real connected communities and produce positive results for citizens. Post-pandemic, some 86% of government leaders agree that these hybrid shifts are permanent in some form. This digitization effort quickly accelerated. The context that begins to emerge is:

  • the cloud is the new data center,
  • Software as a a service is the new app,
  • Internet is the new network that gives us connectivity,
  • The edge is where the person or device is.

ARE YOU READY FOR YOUR NEXT GENERATION OF EMPLOYEES?

For the next generation of government employees, the need for flexibility is the new norm (see our latest survey). As a result, governments will need to rethink their approach to work by broadening the view of how and where work is done.

The new generation is driven by the desire for a better work-life balance. Engaging employees and ensuring their well-being must be a top priority for government leaders as they look to the future. After the pandemic, the public sector must:

  • Put in place solutions to avoid the burnout syndrome,
  • Finding ways to keep employees connected,
  • Develop processes and programs to help ensure the mental health of every employee,
  • Work proactively to attract the right new talent and adopt methods to retain them by helping them develop their leadership skills.

HOW CITIZEN SERVICES ARE CHANGING

The digital and physical world are converging, citizens no longer want to have everything face to face, they expect to receive services digitally. Additionally, with over $350 billion in federal funding going to states and localities, now is the time to accelerate modernization and provide security to enable a superior citizen experience. With the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) in mind, governments will begin to focus on services that compete with private industry so citizens can have that equal experience. To do this, it is essential that the public and private sectors work together as partners, sharing ideas and technologies that can break down the silos that exist in government agencies, increasing efficiency for everyone. For example, when a citizen accesses a state portal (say to pay taxes), they may receive a pop-up message reminding them that their driver’s license has expired. This would immediately link them to the state’s DMV site, providing the citizen with a hassle-free renewal experience.

When we put all of these things together, we make the concept of the digital citizen possible. At Cisco, we are already partnering with state and local governments to drive cross-agency collaboration that can power applications centered on what citizens want versus how government traditionally operates. During the pandemic, we have seen bureaucracy take a back seat, creating opportunities to implement some of these approaches.

HOW YOU CAN PREPARE

As state and local governments transition to a new, more resilient and responsive operating model, a high level of leadership will be paramount (read more in our latest survey of government IT managers). Government IT leaders must stay close to their employees, stay connected, and lead with empathy and compassion.

To successfully serve the next generation workforce, we must also remember that technology is just the enabler. It’s the people and processes that are – and will be – the “secret sauce” for leveraging this full stack to deliver quality citizen and workforce experiences.

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, governments quickly discovered how to cut red tape to get things done. The pandemic has proven that government can act quickly, especially when backed by a reliable and experienced private sector IT partner like Cisco.

At Cisco, we work with the public sector to actively develop and implement innovative, secure solutions that can scale with government needs and improve resilience in times of stress. And with our partner Government Technology, we explore strategies for building the next generation of government (learn more here). We invite you to join us.

IN-DEPTH ON THE NEXT GENERATION OF GOVERNMENT

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